S’mores Cookies

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
16 cookies

Cookies are always comforting and always on trend. Chef Marc Murphy, of Landmarc and Ditch Plains in New York,  presented this recipe at a Cookies for Kids Cancer Bake Sale to benefit pediatric cancer research. His S’mores Cookies competed with treats made by a number of celebrated chefs from such restaurants as Gramercy Tavern, Locanda Verde and Momofuku Milk Bar. Grownups vied with the kids to sample all the baked goods for a worthy cause.

Ingredients

¾ cup butter
½ cup sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 tbsp. maple syrup
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1¼ cups flour
1 cup graham cracker crumbs
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. baking soda
10 oz. semi-sweet chocolate chips
Mini marshmallows

Steps

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Cream butter and sugars with electric mixer until fluffy.

2. In another bowl, combine egg, maple syrup and vanilla; add to creamed mixture and mix until combined. Add flour, crumbs, salt and baking soda; beat on low speed until combined. Fold in chocolate chips.

3. Scoop out dough into 2-oz. mounds and place on baking sheets. Bake about 4 min., or until cookies just start to brown.

4. Remove from oven and immediately place marshmallows on top. Return to oven and bake an additional 3 to 4 min. or until cookies are golden and set. 

Recipe by Chef Marc Murphy, Landmarc and Ditch Plains, New York

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