Roasted Salmon Maki Style with Forbidden Black Rice

Serves: 
6

The great flavor of this perfectly cooked salmon is matched by the stunning presentation. Color, flavor and texture are at their finest in this memorable dish.

Ingredients

2 lb. salmon fillet, skinned and pin boned
3 tbsp. butter, unsalted
1 cup fresh edamame (green soybeans)
1 cup chopped leeks
3 tbsp. fresh ginger, julienned
1 tbsp. chopped garlic
3 tbsp. chopped cilantro
1 cup chicken stock
2 cups forbidden black rice
1 tbsp. rice wine vinegar
6 cups water
3 sheets toasted nori
1 bunch broccolini
2 tbsp. sesame oil
1 cup Asian black bean sauce
1 tbsp. pickled ginger
Cilantro sprigs, coriander oil, and chopsticks, for garnish

Steps

1. Butterfly the salmon fillets to open like a book and lightly pound with a mallet; refrigerate fillets for 30 min.

2. Melt butter in medium skillet. Add edamame, leeks, ginger, and garlic; sauté 5 min. over medium heat. Add the stock; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cook until edamame and leeks are tender, about 10 min. Add chopped cilantro; cook for 2 min.

3. Place mixture in food processor and puree until smooth; season with salt and pepper to taste.

4. Rinse rice in water until the water runs clear. Place rice in colander and allow to thoroughly drain. Place rice in rice cooker and add rice vinegar and water. Cook until tender.

5. Place salmon on cutting board and spread edamame mixture on fillet; roll up like a sushi roll. Wrapsalmon roll in plastic wrap and then in aluminum foil. Refrigerate 30 min., allowing salmon to slightly harden.

6. Remove plastic wrap and aluminum foil from salmon fillet. Cut salmon into 7-oz. portions. Cut the nori sheets in half and wrap one half around each salmon portion (Should look like a large maki roll.)

7. Pan roast the salmon “maki” roll in a medium pan over medium-high heat for 4 min. on one side; turn and cook for 3 min. on other side. Place in oven and cook for 3 min. at 375°F.

8. Mound cooked rice on plate and shape with a cookie cutter. Sauté broccolini in sesame oil and deglaze with soy sauce. Place on top of rice and top with Salmon Maki. Spoon on 2 oz. black bean sauce. Garnish with pickled ginger, cilantro sprigs, coriander oil, and chop sticks.

Source: Recipe from Chef Tom Condron

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