Roasted Red Onion Panzanella

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
24 servings

Leftover bread from dinner service can be recycled into an authentic bread salad with just a few vegetables and seasonings. In this version, Chef Stoll combines roasted onions, cherry tomatoes, fresh thyme, arugula, olive oil and aromatic vinegars for a fresh take on this Tuscan favorite.

Ingredients

9 med. red onions
4  cups extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 1/2 cups balsamic vinegar
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
1/2 cup sherry wine vinegar
1 tbsp. minced shallots
6 loaves Italian bread
1 1/2 cups hot poultry stock
2 tbsp. chopped fresh thyme
9 oz. dandelion greens or arugula leaves
1/2 cup pine nuts
2 cups cherry tomatoes, halved

Steps

  1. Prepare roasted red onions: Cut unskinned onions lengthwise, through the roots, into sixths. Toss onions with 1 cup olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper.
  2. Spread onions on sheet pan and roast at 350°F for 25 min. Turn onions over and roast an additional 20 to 25 min., or until lightly browned on the outside and soft inside. Cool.
  3. When onions are cool, discard outer skin and cut off roots, allowing onion sections to fall apart into individual petals. In large bowl, combine cooked onions with any residual pan juices and set aside.
  4. Prepare sherry vinaigrette: In med. bowl, combine sherry vinegar and shallots; allow to soak for 10 min. Whisk in 1 1/2 cups olive oil until emulsified.
  5. Cut crusts off bread. Tear bread into 1-in. pieces. In large bowl, toss bread with remaining 1 1/2 cups olive oil. Spread on sheet pans and bake in 350°F. oven about 10 min. or until lightly browned.
  6. Per serving, place 1 1/2 cups bread in large bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Add about 1 1/2 tbsp. sherry vinaigrette and 1 tbsp. hot stock; toss until bread absorbs liquids. Add ¼ tsp. thyme, ½ cup greens, 1 tsp. pine nuts and 3 cherry tomato halves. Top with ½ cup roasted onions. Serve immediately.
Source: Recipe and photo courtesy of National Onion Association

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