Roasted Onion Dip

Menu Part: 
Appetizer
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4

An easy dip to prepare. Serve with pita chips, carrot sticks or the dipper of your choice. Prepare a day ahead to allow the flavors time to meld.

Ingredients

2 cups diced white onions
1 tbsp. olive oil
2 cups sour cream
1 cup mayonnaise
1⁄2 cup buttermilk
1 package ranch dressing mix
1⁄4 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
1⁄4 cup minced Italian parsley
1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice

Steps

1. Toss onions with oil in baking dish. Bake at 375°F for 25 min., stirring occasionally. Remove from oven; cool.

2. Whisk together sour cream and remaining ingredients in stainless steel bowl. Add roasted onions; stir until well combined.

3. Store in refrigerator until ready to use.

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