Rare Tuna with Pear, Pine Nuts, and Chili Oil

Menu Part: 
Appetizer
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8

Dining is an exciting adventure with Chef Karen Barnaby. Her lightly seasoned tuna is quickly seared and served with diced fresh pears, julienned green onions andpine nuts. Served with a drizzle of garlic-infused soy sauce, sesame oil and chili oil.

Ingredients

2 cloves garlic, minced
4 Tablespoons (60 mL) soy sauce
2 teaspoons (10 mL) sugar
2 teaspoons (10 mL) roasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon (5 mL) chili oil
4 Tablespoons (60 mL) thinly sliced, green onion
2 8 ounce (250 g) pieces of ahi tuna, 1/2 inch thick
Vegetable oil
Sea salt
2 teaspoons (10 mL) toasted sesame seeds
1 ripe, yet firm Bartlett pear
8 teaspoons (40 mL) mayonnaise
1 Tablespoon (15 mL) raw pine nuts

Steps

1. Combine the garlic, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil and chili oil. Place the green onion into ice cold water.

2. Coat the tuna with the vegetable oil and salt both sides liberally. Heat a heavy frying pan over high heat until just smoking. Place the tuna in the pan and sear until a good, brown crust forms. Turn over and brown on the other side. The tuna should remain rare. Remove from the pan. Strain the soy sauce mixture through a fine sieve, pressing down on the garlic to extract the flavor. Discard the garlic. The soy mixture may be made up to 1 day in advance. Cover and refrigerate.

3. Drain the green onion and roll in a paper towel to dry. Core the pear and cut into 1/4-inch cubes.

4. Cut each piece of tuna into 12 thin slices. Using 3 slices per plate (or six for a main course), arrange in overlapping slices on 8 (or 4) plates. Drizzle with the soy sauce mixture. Place 1 teaspoon (5 mL) of mayonnaise on top of the tuna and top it with a mound of the pear. Drizzle any remaining sauce over the tuna and sprinkle with the sesame seeds, pine nuts and green onion. Serve immediately.

Source: Karen Barnaby, Fish House in Stanley Park; Pear Bureau Northwest

More From FoodService Director

Managing Your Business
briggo coffee haus kiosk

Though diners’ appetites for coffee are seemingly bottomless, adding a full-service coffee shop to every corner of a facility probably isn’t in the playbook. Here’s a look at how two operators added coffee service with relatively small footprints—with one decidedly futuristic (robot barista, anyone?), and the other low-tech but nimble.

Specialty coffee vending at Dell

Dell has a full-service Starbucks on its Red Rock, Texas, campus, but the location isn’t always convenient for a quick coffee pickup. “Certain times, you go into the bistro, like 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., there’s quite a long...

Ideas and Innovation
baked bread

Instead of sourcing value-added product to reduce labor, the food and nutrition team at University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison outsources its baked goods to a local shop that hires only formerly incarcerated workers. The bakery was able to hire two new former inmates in order to keep up with the volume needs of the hospital. “We want to be really entrenched in the community, not just have a building that sits in the center of Madison,” says Amy Mihm, clinical nutrition specialist for the hospital.

Managing Your Business
food symbols allergens

Bellevue School District in King County, Wash., has reduced the instances of life-threatening allergic reactions by 94% since 2013. Wendy Weyer, business manager for nutrition services, says that success stems from direct communication with the district’s 20,000 students.

Q: What was the first thing you did to start reducing allergic reactions?

A: More than five years ago, we changed our menu signage to provide information to students on what the common allergens were on all the foods that were served at every station. We use symbols such as an egg or a wheat stalk for younger...

Ideas and Innovation
cold storage boxes

When working with a small footprint, the back of the house often gets squeezed in the interest of preserving precious seats. But as storage space contracts, these restaurant operators are getting resourceful with everything from shelves to ceiling height to inventory in ways that FSDs can apply, too.

“When we were first tasked with figuring out smaller footprints, when it came to interiors, it was like a bad riddle,” says Trinity Hall, SVP of development for Dallas-based Dickey’s Barbecue Pit, which shrunk its prototype from 2,200 square feet to 1,800. “Let’s make it smaller and...

FSD Resources