Potato Chorizo Croquettes with Smoked Paprika Aioli

Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 

Instead of getting the standard order of fries, customers at the 8 oz. Burger Bar can enjoy these sophisticated potato croquettes as a side or on their own. The garlicky Smoked Paprika Aioli makes for a vibrant signature dipping sauce.


Smoked Paprika Aioli:
2 cups aioli mayonnaise
l cup sour cream
1 tbsp. smoked paprika
1 tbsp. lemon juice
Salt and pepper, to taste

4 qt. salt roasted and riced Idaho potatoes
2 lb. chorizo, rendered, crumbled
2 qt. bechamel sauce
1 pt. diced piquillo peppers
1 qt. diced poached, grilled artichokes
3 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
2 tbsp. chopped fresh thyme
2 tsp. chopped fresh oregano
Salt and pepper, to taste
Egg wash
Fine panko bread crumbs
Vegetable oil


  1. Prepare Smoked Paprika Aioli: In med. bowl, combine all ingredients, seasoning to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate until service.
  2. Prepare Croquettes: In large bowl, combine potatoes, chorizo, béchamel, peppers, artichokes, parsley, thyme, oregano, salt and pepper. Shape mixture into croquettes or balls. Lightly freeze.
  3. Dust croquettes with flour; coat with egg wash and panko crumbs, repeating process twice.
  4. In hot oil, fry croquettes until crisp and lightly browned. Serve hot, with Smoked Paprika Aioli.
Source: Chef Govind Armstrong and Idaho Potato Board

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