Potato and Prosciutto Pizza

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4-6

Chef Jon Ashton
Mad Chef’s Catering & Take Out
Evansville, Ind.

Potatoes are gaining favor as a pizza topping either on their own or partnered with complementary ingredients. Chef Ashton pairs the spuds with prosciutto, garlic and fresh thyme. The raw potatoes are sliced ultra-thin so they can be scattered on the dough and cook as the pizza bakes.

Ingredients

Crust
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup whole wheat flour
1 tsp. active dry yeast
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. sugar
2/3 cup hot water (120-130 F)
1 tsp. olive oil

Toppings
4 tsp. olive oil
1 large garlic clove, thinly sliced
1 lb. unpeeled red potatoes
1 oz. thinly sliced prosciutto, torn into strips
1 cup heavy cream
1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme leaves
Freshly ground black pepper and sea salt

Steps

  1. Prepare crust: In bowl of electric mixer (fitted with the dough hook, if available), combine flours, yeast, salt and sugar. Gradually mix in water and oil.  Knead on med. speed until dough is smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. (If dough hook is not available, knead dough on lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic, about 4 to 6 minutes.) 
  2. Form dough into a ball; place in lightly oiled bowl, turning to coat top.  Cover with towel or plastic wrap; let rise in warm, draft-free place until doubled in volume, about 1 hour. 
  3. Lightly dust 12-inch pizza pan with semolina flour. Punch down dough. On lightly floured surface, roll dough out to 13- to 14-inch circle; fit onto prepared pan. Let rise in warm, draft-free place for 20 minutes. 
  4. Preheat oven to 425 F. Brush top of dough with 2 teaspoons oil. Arrange sliced garlic evenly over top. Using a mandoline, food processor or sharp knife, cut potatoes into very thin slices, about 1/8-inch thick. Scatter potato and prosciutto over dough. Drizzle with cream and remaining 2 teaspoons oil; sprinkle with thyme. Season generously with pepper and lightly with salt, as desired. 
  5. Bake in center of oven for 30 to 35 minutes or until crust edge is golden and cream is bubbly. Let stand 5 minutes. To serve, cut into wedges.
Source: Photo courtesy of United States Potato Board

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