Porky Burger

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

This juicy burger created by Iron Chef Michael Symon is a pork lover’s dream come true. Lean ground pork is formed into patties and grilled, then topped with saucy pulled pork, melted gruyere and pickled onions, all piled on brioche buns. Serve with plenty of napkins!

Ingredients

Porky Burger
3 cups pulled pork in juices (recipe follows)
2 lbs. lean ground pork, 96% lean
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/2tsp. salt
6 potato or brioche burger buns
6 slices gruyere cheese (1/2-oz. each)
1/2 cup pickled red onions or thinly sliced raw red onion, separated into rings
1/2 cup cilantro leaves

Pulled Pork
1 1/2 lb. bone-in pork shoulder blade roast
1/4cup ancho chile powder
1 tbsp. smoked paprika
1 tbsp. whole coriander seeds, toasted
1 1/2 tsp. cumin seed, toasted
2 tsp. salt
1 tbsp. plus 2 tsp. olive oil, divided
24 oz. Mexican beer
2 cups water
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp. chipotle chilies in adobo sauce, finely chopped
1 small onion, sliced, separated into rings
4 cloves garlic, chopped

Steps

Prepare pulled pork:

  1. Combine ancho chile powder, paprika, coriander, cumin and salt in small bowl; set aside.
  2. Cut 2 large pieces of plastic wrap; place on work surface in cross position. Place roast on top in center. Rub 2 tsp. of oil on top; spoon and pat on spice mixture. Tightly wrap pork in plastic wrap; refrigerate 8-12 hr.
  3. Preheat oven to 300°F. Add 1 tbsp. oil to 6-qt. heavy Dutch oven. Heat over med.-high heat. Unwrap roast and place in hot oil. Cook on each side for 1-2 min. or until spices brown and appear slightly dry. Transfer roast to plate. Remove Dutch oven from heat.
  4. Slowly pour in beer, scraping brown bits from bottom of pan. Add water, vinegar, chipotles, onion and garlic. Return to heat and bring to gentle boil.
  5. Add roast to hot liquid. Cover and bake in preheated oven for 2 1/2-3 hr. or until pork is fork tender.
  6. Transfer pork to a cutting board; cool slightly. Meanwhile, pour liquid through a fine mesh strainer; reserve 1 1/2 cups. Discard remaining liquid and solids. Shred meat using 2 forks; transfer to med. container. Add 1½ cups reserved liquid. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use for up to 2 days.

Prepare burgers:

  1. Form ground pork into 6 patties 1/2-in. thick; season both sides with salt and pepper.
  2. Preheat grill to med. Place pulled pork in pot and place in corner to keep warm. Place patties directly over heat. Grill, uncovered, for 8-10 min. or until pork reaches 160°F. internal temperature. Flip patties halfway through grilling. Meanwhile, toast buns on grill.
  3. Top pork patties with cheese. Cover grill; grill for 30 sec. or until cheese is melted.
  4. Place burgers on bun bottoms. Using a slotted spoon, spoon pulled pork on top of burgers. Top with onions, cilantro and bun tops.
Source: Michael Symon; National Pork Board

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