Platings: Citrus and Ancho-Braised Lamb Tostada

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 
2 servings

Scott Mole of Omni Bedford Springs Resort in Bedford, Pa., marries tender leg of lamb with citrus and smoky chiles to create this street-inspired tostada. 


2 each corn tortillas
2 cups black beans, cooked
1 tbsp. garlic, chopped (for black bean spread)
1 tbsp. shallot, chopped
½ each red onion, diced
1 tbsp. garlic, chopped (for tomato/onion mixture)
1 each roma tomato, diced, seeded
½ each avocado, half, peeled
1 each jalapeno, minced
1 cup lettuce, shredded
1 each leg of lamb, boneless
1 each orange
1 each lime
4 pieces garlic (for braising liquid)
¼ cup coriander, ground
5 each ancho chiles
4 cups white wine
Salt and pepper to taste
½ cup tomato paste  


Citrus and Ancho Braised Lamb Tostada:
1. Open leg of lamb and cut into 4 large pieces. Season with salt, pepper and coriander.

2. Sear the lamb until golden brown in a large pot.

3. Deglaze pan with white wine and reduce by ¾.

4. Zest and juice the citrus and add the garlic, ancho chile, white wine and tomato paste. Add enough water to cover the lamb by one inch.

5. Cover pot and place in preheated 230° F. oven. Cook until fork tender, about 3 hours.

6. Remove from oven and allow temperature to drop to 180° F. on counter and place in cooler.

7. Remove lamb from liquid, save liquid for later use. Shred lamb and reserve.

8. Fry corn tortillas, drain on paper towel and hold.

9. Shred the lettuce and reserve.

10. Sauté black beans with shallot and garlic for 2 minutes. Mash beans while hot.

11. Mix garlic, onion, tomato, jalapeno, cilantro. Season with salt and pepper.

12. Dice the avocado into small pieces and add to tomato and onion mixture.

Tostada assembly:
1. Spread the black beans on top of fried tortillas.

2. Add shredded lamb.

3. Add shredded lettuce and stack on top of each other.

4. Top the tostada with the avocado pico de gallo mixture.  

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