Plantain Crusted Snapper

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
1

A pleasure for the eyes as well as the tastebuds, this snapper dish will be sure to delight. Colorful and spicy ingredients come together in a lovely presentation.

Ingredients

2 green plantains
2 oz. ancho chile powder
1 tbsp. salt
4 ears corn on the cob
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 poblano chile, diced
1 red onion, diced
1 tomato, concasse
5 drops habanero chile sauce
2 oz. fresh cilantro, chopped
2 red bell peppers
5 leaves fresh basil
1 tsp. garlic, minced
1 oz. Parmesan, grated
6 oz. olive oil
Salt and pepper, as needed
2 bunches fresh cilantro, stems removed
8 oz. grapeseed oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 12-in. spinach tortilla, cut into a 2-in. wide strip
Canola oil, as needed
1 7-oz. red snapper fillet, skin on

Steps

1. Peel and slice plantains. Deep-fry at 300° F. until crisp; cool. In a food processor, pulse into flakes. Mix with chile powder and 1 tbsp. salt. Reserve.

2. For salad, cut fresh corn off the cob and char in a hot skillet. Over high heat, quickly sauté bell pepper, poblano, and onion. Cool and combine with tomato, habanero sauce, and cilantro. Reserve.

3. For pesto, roast and peel bell peppers. Puree in blender with basil, garlic, Parmesan, oil, salt, and pepper. Reserve.

4. In a blender, combine cilantro and grapeseed oil; season. Reserve oil.

5. Form a ring with tortilla strip and bake at 250° F. for 20 min. or until crisp.


Per order:

1. In smoking-hot canola oil, sear skin side of fillet; flip and sear flesh side. Transfer to a sizzle platter flesh side up. Pat on plantain flakes. Finish in oven, approx. 8 min.

2. Decorate plate with zigzags of red pesto and dots of cilantro oil. Place tortilla ring in center, fill with corn salad . Place fillet on top of ring and serve.

Source: Recipe from Chef John McGrath

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