Peanut Caramel Flan

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
12

Flan is the perfect way to subdue spicy food or any other hearty and flavorful meal. This rendition is topped with creamy caramel and chopped peanuts for an even more flavorful experience.

Ingredients

Unsalted butter (for greasing ramekins)
1 cup unsalted peanuts, chopped
1 1⁄4 lb. granulated sugar
1 cup apple juice
3 cups whole milk
3 cups heavy cream
2 cinnamon sticks
1 vanilla bean, split
8 large eggs
4 egg yolks
6 oz. light brown sugar
1 1⁄4 cups creamy peanut butter
Fresh fruit (optional)
Chopped peanuts (optional)

Steps

1. Preheat oven to 325ºF. Lightly butter 12 individual ramekins and distribute peanuts evenly in the bottom.

2. Combine sugar and apple juice in a small heavy saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until caramel is deep golden brown. Divide evenly among ramekins, tilting to spread along bottom. Place ramekins in a 2-in. deep baking pan and set aside.

3. Combine milk, cream, cinnamon, and vanilla in a large saucepan. Bring just to a boil, cover, and remove from heat. Steep for 30 min.

4. Whisk together eggs, egg yolks, brown sugar, and peanut butter in a large bowl until thoroughly incorporated.

5. Uncover steeped milk and bring just to a boil. Temper egg and sugar mixture by whisking in a steady stream of approximately 1⁄3 of hot milk mixture. Whisk in the remaining hot milk.

6. Strain mixture through a fine mesh strainer. Pour into the peanut caramel-lined ramekins, filling to just below the rims. Pour warm water in the baking pan to reach halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Bake for 30-40 min., or until custards are almost set, but still slightly soft in the center. Chill.

7. To serve, unmold ramekins by running a thin-bladed knife around the edge of the custard; invert onto the serving plate and give the ramekin a firm shake. If desired, garnish with fresh fruit and/or chopped peanuts.

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
cafeteria

Three years ago, Colonial School District in New Castle, Del., started a pilot supper program at its high school. The goal: To make sure the district’s students, 57% of whom are on free or reduced-priced meals, would not be hungry when school is done for the day.

Since its inception, the program has expanded to 12 schools and now provides afterschool meals to children participating in YMCA activities. And it's just one of many such programs popping up in districts throughout the country, as operators add supper to the list of daily meals they provide for students.

Building...
Ideas and Innovation
hydroponics

We put our hydroponic gardens in a spot where students can watch them grow, but at the same time it’s safe from being tampered with. At one of our elementary schools, the gardens are in the kitchen, but there’s a window where students can look in as they walk down the hallway. Some even stop to count how many cucumbers they see.

Ideas and Innovation
food snap

We started a 50-member vegan team in response to students expressing the need for more vegan options. Between our monthly meetings, students are asked to take photos of foods they eat in and out of the dining halls to give us a true picture of the kinds of things they like and the kinds of foods that cause disappointment. This exercise has sparked a lot of conversation and given us more insight into what we could do better.

Ideas and Innovation
hybrid worker

Some of our employees can work four 10-hour days. It’s really helped with balance. We’ve also created a lot of hybrid positions, such as a personal services assistant and foodservice worker role. It allows workers to pick up more shifts and cover both positions.

FSD Resources