North Carolina Sweet Potato Gnocchi with Mascarpone Cheese

sweet potato gnocchi marscapone cheese
Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
10

A sweet and delicious twist to gnocchi. This recipe can be made with butternut squash instead of the sweet potatoes, or an Alfredo versus the mascarpone sauce detailed here.

Ingredients

Gnocchi:
4 med. sweet potatoes
1 med. russet potato
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 egg, beaten
Pinch each of cinnamon and nutmeg
Salt and pepper, to taste

Sauce:
4 shallots, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp. sugar
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1⁄2 cup herb, vegetable, or chicken stock
4 oz. mascarpone cheese
1 bunch sage, finely chopped

Steps

1. Roast sweet potatoes in center of oven at 300°F, about 1 hr., or until tender. Peel and keep warm.

2. Place russet potato in boiling water and cook until tender; drain. Peel and coarsely chop russet potato. In a rice mill, rice warm sweet potatoes and russet potato.

3. Stir in flour, egg, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, and pepper; mix well.

4. Place sweet potato mixture into pastry bag fitted with 1⁄2-in. diameter tip. Bring water to boil in large, open pot. Squeeze pastry tube over boiling water, cutting mixture with kitchen shears at 1⁄2-in. lengths.

5. Cook in boiling water until dough floats to the surface; drain and keep warm. Repeat with remaining dough.

6. In a saucepan, heat shallots, garlic, sugar, cream, and stock. Add cheese and sage. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Combine gnocchi with sauce and serve.

More From FoodService Director

Menu Development
sam kass talking menu directions

Sam Kass, former White House senior policy advisor for nutrition policy and executive director of the Let’s Move campaign, spoke at FSD’s MenuDirections conference in February.

Q: What’s one of the biggest food-related problems facing our country?

A: Obesity is the No. 1 threat to national security—20% of what we’re spending on healthcare is due to obesity. This isn’t a policy problem. The root of our challenge is culture, and what we value in our food. The healthy choice needs to be the easy choice.

Q: What are some important steps to modeling healthy eating and creating...
Menu Development
three sisters salad

“Everyone is doing Thai in college dining,” says Patrick McElroy, campus executive chef for Bon Appetit at Washington University in St. Louis. So he set out to “push the envelope” on ethnic cuisine and offer Native American dishes—a move that had support from the American Indian Student Association. But McElroy didn’t realize the challenge ahead. “I wanted to maintain the integrity and tradition of the food, but there were very few recipes,” he says. “I had to do a lot of research.” To develop the menu, he enlisted the help of chef Nephi Craig, founder of the Native American Culinary...

Managing Your Business
dancing fruit happy

When editor Jill Failla and I sat down to discuss ideas for this month’s cover story, data from FoodService Director’s sister company Technomic was the spark that lit the flame of conversation. She told me the most recent Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report had found that consumers are more willing to order and pay more for items they think are both healthy and tasteful. My questions: OK, what does that look like in practice? How does it factor into operators’ decision-making processes? And what the heck do we call that phenomenon?

After tossing around some ideas, we had it: the...

Menu Development
chili spaghetti

Iconic local dishes like Cincinnati chili may not be entirely healthy, but they are incredibly popular. Across the country, K-12 operators are finding ways to add these foods to their lunch menus while still meeting their nutritional requirements. How are they adapting popular recipes and bringing them to schools—and is it worth it?

Cincinnati chili has been a staple of Mason City Schools lunches for as long as anyone can remember. Located just outside of Cincinnati, the school system serves its chili in two traditional ways: covering a pile of spaghetti, or atop a cheese Coney dog...

FSD Resources