New England Bouillabaisse with Rouille and Croutons

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4

A steaming bowl of this fragrant bouillabaisse is a truly comforting meal. Seafood lovers will adore this succulent feast.

Ingredients

For the Broth:
2-3 tbsp. olive oil
1 small onion, diced
1 med. leek, roots and all (trim off 1 in. of green part), diced, washed, and dried well
1 fennel bulb, top stalks and any tough outer layers removed, diced
2 celery stalks, diced
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tsp. saffron
Pinch red pepper flakes
1 tsp. kosher salt
4 tomatoes, stemmed, seeded, and chopped
2 tbsp. tomato paste
2 cups dry white wine
Juice of 1 orange

For the Fish:
12 littleneck clams, washed well in cold water
1/2 lb. monkfish, trimmed and cut into 2-in. chunks
1/2 lb. haddock filet, skin removed, cut into 2-in. pieces
1/2 lb. cleaned squid bodies, cut into thin rings
12 mussels, scrubbed
12 small shrimp, shelled and deveined
2 tbsp. anisette, (optional)
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup rouille
1 loaf French bread, sliced and toasted

Steps

1. For broth: Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over med.-high heat. Add onion, leek, fennel, celery, garlic, saffron, red pepper flakes, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10 min.

2. Add the tomatoes and tomato paste and stir to combine. Add 2 qt. water, white wine, and orange juice; bring to a boil. Lower the heat to just bubbling and cook for 3 min. (Can be made the day ahead, refrigerated, and reheated when needed. It can also be frozen.)

3. To cook and serve the fish: Add the clams to the broth and cook for 6-8 min. Add the monkfish and stir gently. Simmer for 5 more min. When the clams open and the monkfish is almost cooked, add the haddock, squid, mussels, and shrimp. Add the anisette, if using. Cook for an additional 5 min., or until the haddock is cooked and the mussels open. All the fish should be delicately cooked.

4. Carefully remove fish from broth with a slotted spoon and divide it among 4 large, heated bowls. Bring the broth to a boil and whisk in the 1/4 cup of olive oil. Ladle broth over fish. Sprinkle with chopped parsley. Serve the bouillabaisse with rouille spread on the croutons.

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