Massaman Beef and Potato Curry

massaman beef
Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 
6-8 servings

To offer guests beef without destroying his margins, Chef Kucy transforms more economical sirloin tip into a Thai-style curry. Chunks of potato stretch the dish to feed six to eight diners. 

Idaho Potato Commission


2 lb. beef sirloin tip, cut into 1-in. cubes
2 tbsp. garam masala
2 tbsp. salt
2 tbsp. canola oil
1/4 cup sliced shallots
1 tbsp. chopped peeled gingerroot
2 tbsp. massaman curry paste
2 cans (14 oz.) coconut milk
1 cup beef stock
3 tbsp. tamarind pulp
2 tbsp. brown sugar
3 russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 3/4-in. cubes
1 tbsp. fish sauce
1/4 lb. green beans, blanched and cut into 1-in. pieces
Chopped cilantro leaves and scallions, for garnish


  1. Season beef with garam masala and salt; let stand for 10 to 15 minutes.
  2. In large sauté pan, heat oil. Sear beef cubes in hot oil, working in small batches to avoid overcrowding the pan. Set beef aside.
  3. Add shallots, ginger and massaman curry paste to pan; cook over medium heat 2 minutes. Deglaze pan with 1 can of coconut milk; stir well to scrape up bits on bottom of pan.
  4. Transfer beef, coconut milk mixture, stock, brown sugar and tamarind into a large saucepot; bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook 45 minutes to 1 hour, until beef becomes tender.
  5. Once meat starts to become tender, add potatoes. Continue to simmer 15 to 20 minutes longer. Season with fish sauce. Stir in green beans just before serving. Garnish with cilantro and scallions and serve.
Source: Idaho Potato Commission

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