Marinated Chicken Sandwich

Menu Part: 
Sandwich/Wrap
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

Marinating adds great flavor to these chicken breasts that are grilled and served on a bun with honey mayonnaise.

Ingredients

Marinade:
2 oz. green onion, chopped
1 oz. fresh ginger, sliced
1 orange, 1⁄2-in. slices
1 tsp. garlic, chopped
1 tsp. Dijon mustard
1 tbsp. oyster sauce
1⁄2 cup olive oil
1 tsp. cracked white pepper

6 chicken breasts, boneless, approx. 6 oz. ea.
3 cups orange juice
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 tbsp. green onion, chopped
1 tbsp. red bell pepper, chopped
1 tsp.  honey
1 tsp. mayonnaise
2 tbsp. roasted pecans, crushed
6 potato rolls
Watercress

Steps

1. Combine marinade ingredients in a bowl; add chicken breasts and marinate refrigerated at least 6 hr.

2. For dressing: In a saucepan over medium heat, combine orange juice, mustard, onion, and pepper, and reduce 25-30 min. until mixture starts to thicken. Whisk in honey. Strain and cool.  Add pecans and mayonnaise and season to taste. Chill until needed.

3. Grill chicken just until cooked through. To assemble sandwiches, place chicken breast on roll. Arrange garnishes on a plate with sandwich. Drizzle chicken with dressing and top with watercress. Serve immediately.

Source: Recipe from Chef Philippe Striffeler

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