Madras Curried Vegetables

Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 

At 9 Muses Cafe in New Orleans, chef-owner Larkin Selman introduced this top-selling Madras Style Curried Vegetable dish that reflects his years of sharing a kitchen with an Indian sous chef.


1 cup onion, thinly sliced
2⁄3 cup carrots, thinly sliced
1 oz. lemon grass, minced
1 tsp. garlic puree
1 tsp. ginger puree
1 tbsp. butter
1 tsp. sesame oil
Canola oil, as needed
1 tbsp. curry powder
1 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. coriander
3⁄4 tsp. Spanish paprika
3⁄4 tsp. turmeric
1 tsp. ground ginger
1⁄4 tsp. cardamom
1⁄4 tsp. cayenne
1 tsp. lemon zest, minced
1 tsp. orange zest, minced
4 bay leaves
1 green apple, diced
14 oz. coconut milk
1 1⁄2 tsp. brown sugar
4 oz. orange juice
1 oz. lime juice
1 cup potatoes, peeled, diced and blanched
2 cups red onion, thinly sliced
2⁄3 cup red bell pepper, julienned
2⁄3 cup yellow bell pepper, julienned
2 tsp. garlic puree
3 tsp. ginger puree
1 tsp. lemon zest
10 lb. mixed vegetables, blanched, roasted or grilled, such as broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, fennel, squash, zucchini, endive and tomatoes
40 arugula leaves
40 cilantro leaves
24 spinach leaves, sliced
1⁄2 cup basil chiffonade
1⁄2 cup mint chiffonade
Basmati rice, cooked, as needed
Toasted coconut, for garnish
Cilantro, for garnish


1. In a large saucepan over medium heat, sauté first 5 ingredients in butter and oils, approx. 3-4 min. Add the following 8 spices, lemon zest, orange zest and bay leaves. Add apple and sauté 2 min.

2. Stir in coconut milk, brown sugar, juices and 10 oz. water; simmer 10 min. Add potatoes and cook until tender. Season, puree, strain and reserve curry sauce refrigerated.

3. In a large skillet over medium heat, sauté onion and peppers in oil, approx. 2 min. Add garlic, ginger and lemon zest and cook until tender. Add 24 oz. reserved curry sauce and water, to desired thinness. Bring to a simmer.

4. Add seasonal vegetables; simmer until tender. Stir in arugula, cilantro, spinach, basil and mint; season.

5. Serve vegetables inside a ring of basmati rice. Garnish with coconut and cilantro.

Source: Recipe from Chef Larkin Selman

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