Lobster Risotto with Gran Canaria Cheese

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 

This risotto is pure velvet, and lobster, that supreme ruler of seafood deserves velvet. Canaria cheese is a  sheep, goat and cow's milk cheese with a firm Parmesan-like texture, and develops a fruity, nutty flavor from curing in olive oil.


3 to 4 cups vegetable stock
1/4 cup French green beans
1 baby patty pan squash
2 oz. lobster meat, chunked
1 oz. chanterelle mushrooms
2 oz. butter, divided
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 cup Arborio rice
3 oz. whipped heavy cream
4 oz. Gran Canaria cheese, grated and divided
1/4 cup diced plum tomatoes


  1. Simmer vegetable stock uncovered for 10 min.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil. Add French green beans and patty pan squash; remove from heat. Let sit one min. Drain and immediately submerge in cold water. Drain again. When cool, chop vegetables into bite-size pieces.
  3. Sauté lobster and mushrooms in 2 tbsp. (1 oz.) butter until tender. Set aside.
  4. Heat olive oil in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over med. heat. Add rice and stir until each grain is evenly coated with oil. Add 1 cup vegetable stock and cook, stirring frequently, until stock is almost absorbed by rice. Repeat process three times with remaining stock. Toward the end of cooking process, mixture will become thick and creamy and require more frequent stirring to prevent sticking.
  5. Cook about 30 min., then taste a few grains. Rice should be tender but still have firmness in the center. If done, cover and remove from heat immediately. If not, continue cooking until rice has reached desired tenderness. 
  6. To finish, stir in beans, squash, lobster, mushrooms, remaining 2 tbsp. butter, whipped cream, 3 oz. grated Gran Canaria cheese, and salt and pepper to taste. 
  7. Garnish with diced plum tomatoes and additional grated cheese. Serve immediately.
Source: Courtesy of Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board

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