Ligurian-style Tuna Salad

Menu Part: 
Salad
Cuisine Type: 
Italian
Serves: 
6 servings

Though best known for its pesto, the Liguria region of Italy is also known for its seafood. This salad features tuna, fresh marjoram, tarragon, capers, anchovy fillets, eggs and lemon juice to create a bright and flavorful taste of Italy.

Ingredients

2 lb. tuna
1 lemon, sliced thin
2 bunches fresh marjoram
1⁄4 cup peppercorns
3 tbsp. sea salt
2 to 4 cups olive oil
1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, cleaned, rough chopped
1 bunch tarragon, cleaned, rough chopped
1 tbsp. capers
4 anchovy fillets, rinsed
3 tbsp. red wine vinegar
1 garlic clove
2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped
4 slices levain bread, day-old or grilled
2 tbsp. lemon juice
1 bunch radishes, cleaned, split
1⁄4 lb. fava beans, cleaned
1⁄4 lb. English peas, cleaned
2 small fennel bulbs, cleaned,shaved thin
3 small raw artichokes, shaved thin
20 small cherry tomatoes
4 hard-cooked eggs, halved
20 small black olives, pitted
1 piece bottarga (dried, salted tuna roe)

Steps

1. Marinate tuna with slices of lemon, marjoram, peppercorns and salt. Let stand for at least an hour, but overnight is best. Place marinated tuna in thick-bottomed, nonreactive pot just large enough to hold fish. Pour in enough olive oil to immerse tuna completely. Cover and place into 350°F preheated oven. Bake for about 1 hour, or until cooked. Cool for 2 hours.

2. For salsa verde, place parsley, tarragon, capers, anchovies, red wine vinegar and garlic in food processor. Purée on low speed, then slightly increase speed while slowly adding 1 cup olive oil. Once all oil has been added, and mixture is well puréed, place into bowl and gently stir in chopped egg.

3. Place bread on large platter and drizzle with ¼ cup salsa verde. For lemon vinaigrette, combine lemon juice, 1/3 cup more olive oil and salt to taste.

4. In large bowl, fleck tuna into 1-in. chunks, add radishes, fava beans, peas, fennel, artichokes and tomatoes. Sprinkle with salt and dress with 1/3 cup of lemon vinaigrette, gently mix, then place over bread.

5. Put halved eggs and olives around salad. Drizzle with another ¼ cup salsa verde. Shave bottarga over salad. 

Recipe by Oracle, Redwood Shores, Calif. (Bon Appétit)

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