Lentil Falafel Sandwich

Menu Part: 
Sandwich/Wrap
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4

Traditional falafel patties or balls are spicy, deep-fried, bean-based foods that get their name from the Arabic word fulful, which means pepper. They make equally satisfying main courses and light snacks.

Ingredients

Falafel
4 cups cooked lentils
3⁄4 cup flour, divided
2 tsp. ground cumin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1-2 tbsp. lemon juice
Salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
1⁄2 cup finely chopped onion
1 large egg
Vegetable oil, for frying

4 pita breads, warmed and halved
Shredded carrots
Shredded radishes
Shredded zucchini
Creamy herbed yogurt dressing
 

Steps

1. Process lentils, 1⁄4 cup flour, cumin, garlic, lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste until almost smooth. Add onion and egg; process to combine. Transfer mixture to a bowl.

2. Combine remaining 1⁄2 cup flour with salt and pepper to taste. Form lentil mixture into 1 1⁄2-inch balls; coat with seasoned flour. Deep fry balls in 350 F oil 3-5 minutes, or until crisp but fluffy; drain and keep warm.

3. Per sandwich, fill pita halves with falafel, carrots, radishes and zucchini; top with herbed yogurt dressing.

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