Lemon Rosemary Roasted Chicken

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

Chopped rosemary, garlic and lemon zest are rubbed under the sink of tightly packed and vacuum-sealed chicken breasts, which are then delicately cooked in a bain marie. Serve with rosemary lemon sauce, vegetables and potatoes.

Ingredients

1 tbsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary
1 tsp. finely minced garlic
1 tsp. finely chopped lemon zest
6 (9-oz.) airliner chicken breasts or supremes, wing bone Frenched
1⁄2 tsp. sea salt
1⁄4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. butter
1 sprig rosemary
1⁄2 tsp. fleur de sel
1 cup red wine sauce
Choice of vegetables
Choice of potatoes

Steps

1. Heat bain marie to 168°F and maintain at this temperature.

2. In small bowl, combine chopped rosemary, garlic, and lemon zest. Peel back skin on each chicken breast and rub rosemary mixture onto both sides of meat. Replace skin over meat and season with salt and pepper.

3. Vacuum-pack the breasts into individual plastic bags, making sure to remove all the air. Place packages into bain marie and cook until chicken reaches an internal temperature of 160°F. (On one bag, place a strip of thick foam adhesive stripping tape and insert a digital probe. The foam tape with will allow the vacuum seal to remain intact and you will have a constant read-out of the internal temperature.)

4. Remove packages from bain marie and immediately submerge into an ice bath. When completely chilled, refrigerate the chicken in bags until service.

5. For service: Heat bain marie to 168°F. Place precooked chicken (still in the bag) in water bath for 10 min.

6. Heat a heavy sauté pan over medium-high heat. Remove packages from bain marie and remove the chicken from bags. Season chicken with salt and pepper.

7. Combine olive oil, butter, and rosemary sprig in the preheated pan. Add chicken breasts, skin-side down; cook 3 min., or until skin is golden brown.

8. Remove chicken from pan, slice, season with fleur de sel, and serve with the sauce, vegetables and potatoes.

Source: Recipe from Chef Robert Sulatycky

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