Idaho Potato and Chicken Gumbo

Menu Part: 
Soup
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
Makes 10 8-oz. portions

For a taste of New Orleans, this soup features a classic roux, Creole seasoning, Idaho potatoes and pulled chicken. The soup also contains onions, red and green peppers, celery and garlic.

Ingredients

Brown roux:
1/2 lb. butter
1/2 lb. flour

14 cups chicken stock
6 tbsp. Brown Roux (recipe above)
1 1/2 cups Idaho potatoes, peeled, shredded
1 cup yellow onion, diced
1 cup yellow, red and green peppers, diced
1 cup celery, diced
1 tbsp. minced garlic
2 lbs. chicken meat, cooked, pulled
2 tbsp. Creole Seasoning (recipe follows)
8 cups Idaho potatoes, cubed and sautéed

Creole seasoning:
2 tbsp. paprika
1 tbsp. salt
1 tsp. black pepper
1 tsp. white pepper
1 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. dried thyme
1/2 tsp. dried basil

Steps

1. For roux: Slowly brown flour on a sheet pan at 300°F. Stir mixture halfway through (about 10 to 15 mins.) to achieve an even browning. The flour should be a light khaki color and will smell like roasted nuts after 20 to 30 mins. On stovetop, cook flour and butter over medium-high heat until a brown, smooth consistency occurs. Once roux has cooled, cover and leave unrefrigerated until needed.

2. In large stockpot, bring chicken stock to a boil.

3. Temper approximately 6 tbsp. of roux into broth. Add 1/2 cup of hot broth to roux and mix completely. Add broth and roux mixture back into boiling broth and whisk.

4. Add potato and simmer for 12 mins. Add onion, peppers, celery, garlic and chicken pieces.

5. For Creole Seasoning: Combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly.

6. Add Creole seasoning. Taste and adjust seasoning, if desired. Continue to cook for another 10 mins. [Note: The vegetables should be cooked but still firm. Ladle 8 to 12 oz. of gumbo over potatoes.]

Recipe by Zale Lipshy University Hospital, Dallas

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