Hickory Smoked Pork Salad

Menu Part: 
Salad
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8

This artfully put together salad stars hickory smoked pork with a cast of delicious ingredients. It is all served on a flaky filo cup.

Ingredients

12-16 oz. pork tenderloin, cleaned and trimmed
8 oz. apple cider
6 filo dough sheets, cut into sixths
2 oz. peanut oil
2 oz. wild rice powder
2 cups cranberries, dried and blanched
2 cups apple cider, reduced by half
1⁄2 cup vegetable stock, slightly thickened
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 tsp. fresh thyme, chopped
1 tsp. pepper
2 oz. balsamic vinegar
2 oz. olive oil
16 oz. varietal greens
4 oz. wheat berries, oven roasted
8 shiitake mushrooms, blanched
Dried cranberries, for garnish
Diced sour apple, for garnish
Roasted pumpkin seed, chopped, for garnish

Steps

1. Marinate pork tenderloin in apple cider for at least 1 hr. in refrigerator.

2. Prepare filo cups by stacking four filo squares, brushing each lightly with peanut oil and sprinkling with wild rice powder, offsetting corners.

3. Place each stack in a lightly oiled monkey dish and fill with dried beans to prevent rising. Bake at 325° F. until golden brown. Discard beans and remove filo from dishes. Set aside.

4. For vinaigrette, puree 2 cups of cranberries and blend with apple cider, vegetable stock, cinnamon, thyme, pepper, and vinegar. Add olive oil to mixture and emulsify. Set aside.

5. In a pan over high heat, sear all sides of the tenderloin until it is a nice brown color. Smoke tenderloin to an internal temperature of 130° F.

6. Toss greens with 8 oz. vinaigrette and 4 oz. wheat berries.

Per Serving:
1. Place filo cup at 1 o’clock on large round plate and place mixed greens flowing from cup.

2. Shingle 1 1⁄2 oz. of sliced pork tenderloin on plate, overlapping greens.

3. Drizzle remaining vinaigrette over the pork and garnish with a shiitake mushroom, dried cranberries, diced apple, and pumpkin seeds.

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