Herb-roasted Halibut with Sun-dried Tomato Risotto

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
Six servings

Filled with endless flavor and color, this halibut dish also features veggies and a touch of honey.

Ingredients

1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs
1 tbsp. chopped basil
1 tbsp. chopped parsley
1 tbsp. chopped chives
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
1 tbsp. honey
1 tsp. black pepper
6 4-oz. portions boneless, skinless halibut filets
4 tsp. Dijon mustard
2 tbsp. olive oil
White wine as needed

Risotto
1 tbsp. olive oil
1/3 cup chopped onion
1 tbsp. chopped garlic
1.5 cups arborio rice
2 oz. chopped sun-dried tomato
1 tsp. black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
8 cups low-sodium chicken stock
1/2 cup low-sodium Parmesan cheese
1/4 fresh chopped basil

Sauce
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1 tbsp. chopped garlic
1/2 cup julienned roasted red peppers
1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 1 cup water

Steps

  1. Combine first seven ingredients together.
  2. Rub top of each filet with mustard. Coat fish with breadcrumb mixture.
  3. Heat oil in nonstick skillet. Sear fish on one side over medium heat for 3 minutes. Turn fish over and sear for 2 minutes. Deglaze pan with wine and place in 325°F oven for 6 minutes, or until fish reaches internal temperature of 145°F.

Risotto

  1. Heat oil in 2-quart pan. Add onion and sweat on low heat. Add garlic and sweat one minute.
  2. Add rice and toast for 2 minutes. Add tomato and stir continuously for 1 minute. Add black pepper.
  3. Add wine and stir until absorbed completely.
  4. Slowly add chicken stock 1/2 cup at a time, stirring continuously, until all liquid is absorbed. Continue to repeat process until rice is tender and creamy, about 40 minutes.
  5. Fold in cheese and basil.

Sauce

  1. Bring chicken broth to a boil. Add garlic and red peppers.
  2. Whisk in arrowroot until light sauce consistency is achieved.

To Serve

  1. Plate halibut and top with sauce. Add risotto as side dish; garnish with tomato rose, lemon wedge and fresh herbs. Serve with trimmed asparagus.
Source: Lake Vista Retirement Community, Lake Vista, Ohio

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