Gyro-Burger with Yogurt Sauce

Menu Part: 
Sandwich/Wrap
Cuisine Type: 
Mediterranean
Serves: 
4 servings

This recipe brings the tastes of Greece to customers love of burgers.  The burger itself features chopped spinach, cumin and garlic and is topped with a creamy yogurt sauce.

Ingredients

1 lb. ground American Lamb
 1 tsp. dried oregano, crushed
 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
 1/2 tsp. pepper
 1/4 tsp. onion powder
 1/4 tsp. ground cumin
 1/4 tsp. salt
 2 pita bread rounds (6-inch), halved crosswise or 4 hamburger buns
 1 cup chopped fresh spinach or lettuce

Yogurt Sauce:
 3/4 cup plain low-fat yogurt
 1/2 medium cucumber, peeled and chopped (about 2/3 cup)
 2 green onions, thinly sliced
 1 tbsp. chopped fresh mint or 1 teaspoon dried mint, crushed
 1/4 tsp. granulated sugar
 1/4 tsp. garlic powder
 Salt, optional

Steps

1. In large bowl, combine oregano, garlic powder, pepper, onion powder, cumin and salt. Add lamb; mix well.

2. Form into 4 patties, about 3/4-inch thick. Grill or broil about 5 minutes on each side or to desired degree of doneness.

3. For yogurt sauce: In medium bowl, combine yogurt, chopped cucumber, sliced green onion, mint and sugar. Place gyro-burger in pita pocket or hamburger bun; top with chopped spinach and yogurt mixture.

Recipe and image provided by the American Lamb Board

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