Grilled Pork Porterhouse with Sorghum Glaze

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8

Grilled pork is tender, juicy and redolent with a smoky flavor that balances the earthy, sweet sorghum glaze. Sorghum is made from the sorghum cane which is typically planted for the sole purpose of making syrup.

Ingredients

2 tbsp. garlic, minced
32 juniper berries, crushed
2 tbsp. fresh sage, finely minced (or 2 tsp. dried sage)
4 tbsp. kosher salt
2 tbsp. freshly ground black pepper
8 center-cut, closely trimmed pork loin chops, each weighing 12-14 oz.

Sorghum Glaze for Pork
2 tbsp. peanut oil
1⁄4 cup shallots, minced
2 tbsp. poblano chiles, minced
2 tbsp. garlic, minced
1 tbsp. jalapeño chiles, minced
1 tbsp. red pepper flakes
1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. ground cumin
2 tbsp. ground chile powder (preferably freshly ground from dried chiles)
1 cup chicken stock
1 cup veal or beef stock
2 tbsp. honey
1⁄2 cup sorghum
1 tbsp. tomato paste
1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. red wine vinegar.

Steps

1. In a large bowl, mix the garlic, juniper berries, sage, salt, and pepper. Rub the mixture over the chops. Place chops in a single layer in a nonreactive pan, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 12-24 hours, but no longer, or they will become too salty.

2. When you are ready to grill the chops, rub off excess marinade with a damp paper towel. Brush with sorghum glaze (see recipe below). Grill chops approximately 8 min. per side for medium rare or 10 min. per side for medium (grilling longer will result in a dry chop). Serve immediately.

Sorghum Glaze for Pork

1. Heat peanut oil in a small heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. When hot, add the shallots, poblano chiles, garlic, ginger, jalapeño chiles, red pepper flakes, cumin, and chile powder. Stir to combine well. Cover saucepan and sweat the ingredients for 7-8 min., stirring 3 or 4 times.

2.Add the stock and stir to combine. Increase the heat to medium-high; bring mixture to a boil. Add honey, sorghum, tomato paste, and vinegar. Bring to a brisk simmer. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 min. or until mixture is reduced by a third. Use immediately or cool to room temperature, cover, and refrigerate. Tightly covered, the glaze will keep for 2 to 3 days.

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