Grilled Fajita Salad

Menu Part: 
Salad
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
1-2 servings

Deconstructed fajitas create a colorful salad that’s packed with contrasting textures and flavors. The protein choices can be varied—chicken, steak and shrimp all work equally well—and grilled vegetables, pinto beans, creamy avocados, crisp tortilla strips and a zingy serrano vinaigrette round out the hearty lunch entree.

Ingredients

2 oz. jalapeño butter (recipe follows)
2 oz. bell pepper, julienned
2 oz. onion, julienned
4 oz. cooked chicken or steak, cut into ½-in. strips or 4 oz. cooked shrimp
3 oz. Serrano Vinaigrette (recipe follows)
4 oz. lettuce mix
4 oz. pinto beans, drained and rinsed
1 oz. shredded Monterey Jack and cheddar cheese blend
2 oz. fried tortllla strips
1 tbsp. pico de gallo
1 tbsp. pepitas (roasted pumpkin seeds)
1 oz. avocado, peeled, seeded and diced
I tbsp. cotija cheese, crumbled

Jalapeño Butter
2 oz. margarine, at room temperature
2 oz. butter, at room temperature
1 tbsp. minced jalapeño
1 1/2 tsp. minced garlic
3/4 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp. hot pepper sauce
1/4 tsp. Mexican seasoning
1/4 tsp. minced cilantro stems

In bowl of stand mixer, combine butter and margarine. With paddle attachment, beat until smooth and creamy. Add remaining ingredients; continue to blend on low until blended. Refrigerate until ready to use.
Yield: 1/2 cup

Serrano Vinaigrette
4 oz. vinaigrette dressing
3/4 tsp. minced Serrano peppers
1/2 tsp. minced garlic
1/2 tsp. chopped cilantro
1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper

Whisk all ingredients together until well blended.
Yield: 1/2 cup

Steps

  1. In sauté pan over med.-high heat, melt jalapeño butter. Add bell peppers and onions; sauté until tender-crisp. Add cooked meat or shrimp; stir until heated through. Remove from heat.
  2. In large bowl, toss lettuce, pinto beans, shredded cheese, tortilla strips, pico de gallo, pepitas and remaining 2 oz. Serrano Vinaigrette. Arrange on plate; top with cooked fajita mixture, avocado and cotija cheese. 
Source: Recipe and photo courtesy of California Avocado Board

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