Grilled Culotte Steak with Truffled Fries and Carrots Ossobucco

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Mediterranean
Serves: 
4

This flavorful grilled steak is a good match for fries that are drizzled with truffle oil. Scrumptious carrots round out the meal.

Ingredients

Grilled Steak:
2 1⁄2 lb. culotte steak, trimmed and cut into 4 equal portions
4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper

Truffled Fries:
4 Idaho potatoes, peeled, cut into 1⁄4-in. slices, and soaked in 1 gal. water for about 10 min.
Salt and pepper
2 tbsp. truffle oil

Carrots Ossobucco:
2 large carrots, sliced on bias (Chinese roll cut)
4 shallots, chopped
1 tsp. chopped garlic
1⁄4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
6 pods star anise
3 cups red wine
4 cups veal demi-glace
Salt and pepper
Butter
 

Steps

1. Prepare steak: Up to 1 hr. before service, rub steak with olive oil and sprinkle with a generous amount of salt and pepper. Set aside.

2. Par-cook Truffled Fries (can be done day before): Drain potatoes and blanch in 275°F oil for 40 sec.;
repeat, allowing fries to rest 20 sec. in between. Set aside.

3. Prepare Carrots Ossobucco: In a sauté pan, heat olive oil. Add shallots; sauté until translucent. Add garlic, sautéing until golden. Stir in star anise and deglaze with red wine; reduce by half.

4. Add veal demi-glace and bring to a boil; season lightly with salt and pepper. Add carrots; return to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook 15-20 min., or until tender. Depending on consistency of wine reduction, remove carrots and finish reducing liquid until it is a sauce consistency. Set aside.

5. For service, grill steak to desired doneness. Set aside and let rest at least 3 min.

6. Prepare the fries: Fry the blanched potatoes in 365°F oil for 3-4 min., until golden brown and crispy. Remove and shake off excess oil. Toss potatoes with salt and pepper and drizzle with truffle oil.

7. Complete the carrots: In a saucepan, bring carrots up to gentle simmer to heat through; adjust seasonings and finish with butter.

8. To plate: Slice meat into five to seven slices on a slight bias against the grain; surround with carrots, sauce, and fries.
 

Source: Recipe from Chef Brian Weiss

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