Grand Shellfish Sampler

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

An assortment of popular shellfish prepared in a variety of ways makes a great sampler. Zesty sauces tie it all together.

Ingredients

Mini Crab Cakes:
1 lb. jumbo lump crab meat, picked over
3⁄4 cup plus 11⁄2 cups bread crumbs
1⁄3 cup mayonnaise
1⁄4 cup chopped parsley
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 egg, beaten
2 tsp. seafood seasoning
Vegetable oil, for sautéeing

Panko-Crusted Clams:
1 dozen littleneck clams
3 tbsp. melted butter
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup panko
1 tbsp. minced parsley

Sesame Scallops:
1 lb. sea scallops
2 tbsp. soy sauce
Egg wash
1 cup black sesame seeds
Vegetable oil, for sautéeing

Grilled Shrimp:
1 lb. whole shrimp
Olive oil
Salt and coarse ground pepper

Lemon wedges
Parsley sprigs
Mustard-mayonnaise sauce
Ponzu dipping sauce
 

Steps

1. For crab cakes: Lightly combine crabmeat, 3⁄4 cup bread crumbs, mayonnaise, parsley, mustard, egg, and seasoning in bowl. Cover and chill until firm.

2. Spread remaining 11⁄2 cups bread crumbs on baking sheet. Form rounded teaspoons of crab mixture into 1-in. rounds; flatten slightly and coat with bread crumbs. Transfer to another sheet pan and chill.

3. Heat 1⁄4 in. oil in large sauté pan. Add crab cakes in batches and fry until brown on both sides, adding more oil if needed. Keep warm in 200°F oven.

4. For clams: Steam clams until shells open; separate shells, leaving clams on bottom shell.

5. Sauté garlic in melted butter until soft. Stir in panko and minced parsley; sprinkle over each clam in the shell. Run under broiler until crumb topping turns golden.

6. For scallops: Rinse scallops and pat dry. Brush with soy sauce and egg wash; coat with sesame seeds.

7. Heat 1⁄2 in. oil in sauté pan. Add scallops in batches and sauté 2 min. per side, or until cooked through. Keep warm.

8. For shrimp: Clean shrimp, leaving heads and tails intact. Brush with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill 2-3 min., or until cooked through.

9. For service: Arrange shellfish on tiered serving tray. Garnish with lemon and parsley; accompany with mustard-mayonnaise and ponzu sauces.
 

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