Goose Terrine

Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 
French
Serves: 
4

A treasured item in France, a 'terrine' gets its name from the rectangular mold used in the preparation of foie gras.

Ingredients

8 prunes (dried plums)
1⁄2 cup Armagnac, plus more for preparing foie gras
1 Grade A lobe foie gras
1⁄2 gal. milk
1 cup aspic
Salt and white pepper, to taste
1 cup shredded, prepared goose or duck confit
Sugar, if needed
Brioche, for serving

Steps

Two days ahead:

1. Cover prunes with Armag-nac; cover with plastic wrap and let stand in warm place 10-12 hours.

2. Bring foie gras to room temperature. Sepa_rate large lobes from smaller lobes; remove all veins and blood spots, keeping the pieces intact. Cover with milk and refrigerate overnight.

One day ahead:

1. Preheat oven to 250°F. Line a small metal loaf pan with plastic wrap, leaving a generous overhang; cut a piece of cardboard to fit the top of the pan.

2. Remove foie gras from milk and dry on paper towels. Divide into three equal portions.

3. Heat the aspic until liquefied.

4. In a cold sauté pan, place one portion foie gras; season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle lightly with Armagnac and place in oven until warmed through to the top (foie gras should not turn gray).

5. Layer bottom of loaf pan with first portion of cooked foie gras.

6. Divide confit into two equal portions and layer one in the loaf pan; spoon in aspic until meat is wet.

7. Cook remaining two portions of foie gras as above and repeat layering the foie gras, confit, and aspic, finishing with a last layer of foie gras. Fold plastic wrap over the top of the terrine and cover with the cardboard. Place a weight on top and refrigerate 10-12 hours or overnight.

To serve:

Warm prunes and soaking liquid, sweetening with sugar if needed. Slice and toast brioche.Unmold and unwrap the terrine. Slice and plate, drizzling with prune-Armagnac mixture. Serve with brioche.

Source: Recipe from Chef Marc Orfaly

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