Gluten-Free Seared Salmon with Grilled Puttanesca Salsa

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 


This easy salmon dish topped with a bold puttanesca salsa will really showcase the best that your kitchen has to offer. 


4 – 6 oz. salmon filets
Sea salt & black pepper
3 heirloom tomatoes, quartered and seeded
1 red bell pepper cut in half & core, seeds & ribs removed
½ red onion, sliced into ¼ inch thick slices
4 oz. good quality olive oil, divided
1 Tablespoon RC Chopped Garlic in Oil
4 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon RC Healthy Gluten-Free Seafood Base not diluted
1 teaspoon anchovy paste
1 Tablespoon capers, chopped
2 teaspoons minced fresh oregano
8 pitted kalamata olives, chopped
4-6 pitted green Sicilian olives, chopped


  1. Season salmon filets with sea salt & freshly ground black pepper
  2. Heat a nonstick pan to a very high heat and sear salmon fillets bone side only until well crusted and finish in oven until internal temperature reaches 145°F and reserve
    Note: (Recommend not turning the salmon filets onto the skin side until time to plate. This will eliminate the possibility of the skin sticking to the pan.)
  3. While the salmon is cooking, combine 2 oz. olive oil, tomatoes, red bell pepper and red onion slices with 1 Tbsp. RC Chopped Garlic in Oil
  4. On a very hot grill sear all until slightly charred and softened
  5. Immediately place red pepper in brown paper bag and cut tomato & onion into small dice
  6. Peel skin from grilled red pepper and cut into ½ inch thick julienne strips and add to tomato and onion mixture
  7. In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar, RC Healthy Foundations Gluten-Free Seafood Base and anchovy paste
  8. Slowly drizzle in remaining 2 oz. of olive oil and whisk until vinaigrette is blended
  9. Pour vinaigrette over grilled vegetables and add chopped capers, oregano & olives, blend then taste and season with sea salt & black pepper


More From FoodService Director

Managing Your Business
alumni worker

It’s a sure sign that a school is doing something right when its students want to come back and work as adults. From the standpoint of the foodservice director, though, there is plenty to gain from retaining homegrown talent—call it the ultimate return on investment. In the wake of back-to-school season, two dining programs with a robust alumni contingent share their thoughts on hiring former customers.

Local expertise

At Georgia Southern University, about one-third of Eagle Dining Services’ 107 full-time employees are alumni. “They way we do things on our campus may be very...

Managing Your Business
business ladder climbing illustration

Recruiting talent is only half the battle for Mike Folino, associate director of nutrition services at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Once he’s attracted good employees, providing clear opportunities for advancement can help retain them—but knowing when to bring up the topic in conversation can be tricky.

Prior to hiring

Folino likes to touch on advancement during the initial interview process, but the extent to which he does so changes case by case. “I have had interviews where we knew right away that we needed to discuss our structure and...

Ideas and Innovation
woman surprise

When I joined the staff at FoodService Director in the spring of 2015, I couldn’t believe how much there was to learn about the intricacies of the industry. My past experience, from kindergarten to my college days to on-the-job meals, would lead me to believe that noncommercial dining was a kind of automated process—an amenity that’s expected, and one you only become aware of if something goes wrong.

But as with my own household chores, there are no magical elves making sure the business of feeding students, seniors and hospital patients is done, and done well. Foodservice...

Managing Your Business
hands team

In November, students at University of Missouri in Columbia began leading protests against discrimination faced by people of color on campus—including some marches through the dining halls. Julaine Kiehn, director of the school’s campus dining services, said the 2015-16 school year was a tough one, but she was proud of MU’s students for being at the forefront of a national movement.

And not only did the protests launch important conversations with students, but also with staff. Kiehn heard the protests and thought that her student workers, at least, might not feel safe and welcome...

FSD Resources