Gluten-Free Blueberry Pancakes

Serves: 
About 14-16 (3-in.) pancakes

Chef Beth Hilson, author of Gluten-Free Makeover, developed a light, self-rising flour blend using sorghum and amaranth flours—both of which contain protein to help add structure to gluten-free items—blended with rice flour, tapioca starch and cornstarch. The result is a gluten-free pancake, chock full of blueberries, that looks and tastes very close to the original.

Ingredients

2 cups gluten-free self-rising flour blend (recipe follows)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/3 cup sugar
3 large eggs, separated
1½ cups milk
¾ tsp. vanilla extract
6 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted (or non-dairy buttery spread)
1 cup fresh blueberries or bananas, sliced

Gluten-Free Self-Rising Flour Blend
Yield: About 4 cups

1¼ cups white rice flour
1 cup sweet white sorghum flour
¾ cup amaranth flour
¾ cup cornstarch (3.5 ounces) or potato starch
¼ cup tapioca starch or flour
2 tbsp. baking powder
2 tsp. xanthan gum
1½ teaspoons salt 

Steps

1. Combine flour blend, baking powder and sugar in large bowl.

2. In another bowl, whisk egg yolks, milk, vanilla and butter until blended. Add mixture to dry ingredients in large bowl; whisk to blend.

3. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites until soft peaks form; do not overbeat. Fold half the whites into batter and blend. Gently fold in remaining whites; do not blend completely. (Bits of white foam should still be visible.)

4. Preheat griddle or flattop to 350°F-375°F. Lightly oil surface. With ¼ cup scoop, drop batter onto preheated griddle.

5. After batter has begun to set, sprinkle blueberries or banana pieces over surface. When underside is golden brown, flip pancake and cook an additional 3-5 min. or until browned on the second side. Serve with real maple syrup or blueberry compote.1. Combine all ingredients. Refrigerate until ready to use. 

Recipe by Chef Beth Hilson, author, Gluten-Free Makeovers, Glastonbury, Conn.

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