Flounder Stuffed with Corn and Poblanos

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
12 portions

Chef Anthony Young says this dish is always popular with students at UMass, where the average student consumes 21 pounds of fish a year. Topping the dish with a tomato salsa sets off the white of the flounder with a burst of color as well as flavor.

Ingredients

2 oz. polenta
8 oz. water
8 oz. corn
1 oz. diced poblano chilies
4 oz. sour cream
4 oz. cheddar cheese
2 lb. flounder filets
1 tbsp. salt
1 tsp. black pepper
2 tsp. paprika

Tomato Salsa
Yield: 12 portions
8 oz. medium diced tomatoes
1 oz. thinly sliced scallions
3 oz. diced poblano chilies
1 tsp. chopped cilantro
1 1/2 tsp. lime juice
2 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper

Steps

  1. In large pan over medium-high heat, add water and bring to a boil. Add polenta and whisk until polenta is cooked through, about five minutes. Add corn, poblano, sour cream and cheddar. Reserve for stuffing.
  2. Place flounder filets skin side down and place 2 tablespoons stuffing in center. Roll up tightly and place on sheet pan. Season with salt, pepper and paprika.
  3. Roast in 350°F oven for 6 to 8 minutes, or until stuffing reaches 140°F. Top with dollop of salsa (recipe follows).

Tomato Salsa

  1. Place all ingredients in mixing bowl and toss to combine.
Source: University of Massachusetts, Amherst

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