Five-Grain Croquettes

Serves: 
16

These croquettes are far from bland. The sautéed vegetables and mix of grains will lend all the flavor this dish needs.

Ingredients

1⁄2 cup organic sushi rice (jasmine rice can be substituted)
2 tbsp. amaranth
2 tbsp. teff
2 tbsp. quinoa
2 tbsp. millet
2 1⁄2 cups water
1 tsp. sea salt
1 cup minced onion
Red bell pepper, finely diced
1⁄2 cup finely diced celery
2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
Black pepper, to taste

Steps

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Rinse rice and grains in a strainer. Drain and place in saucepan with water and 1⁄2 tsp. sea salt. Bring to a boil then lower heat, cover, and simmer for 30 min.

3. Meanwhile, place vegetables with olive oil, remaining salt, and pepper in an 8-in. sauté pan over med. heat. Cook 8-10 min., or until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally.

4. Reduce heat low, cover, and cook for 10-15 min. or until vegetables are tender. Do not brown; add a tbsp. of water to prevent this.

5. When grains are done, spoon into a med. mixing bowl. Add vegetables and mix. Set the mixture aside and cool.

6. Lightly oil a cookie sheet. Wet hands and form mixture into golf ball-size croquettes. Place them 1 in. apart on sheet and flatten slightly. Bake 20 mins.

7. Plate 4 per dish with a simple tomato sauce and sautéed vegetable of choice.

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