DoMundo’s Piggyback Rub Pulled Pork with DoMundo’s Original Recipe BBQ Sauce

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
About 8 pounds of pork

Barbecue is very popular at DoMundo’s, a churrascaria restaurant on the campus of this 33,000-student university. Executive Chef Eric Cartright says many of the recipes, including these, have been developed by Chef Jeremy Elmore, and DoMundo’s Original Recipe BBQ Sauce is now bottled and sold for retail by Dining Services. One application of the pulled pork recipe, Cartright says, is a pizza, using the sauce as the base and the pork as the meat component, along with red onion and mozzarella, provolone and pepper jack cheeses.

Ingredients

Piggyback Rub
Yield: 1 gallon

2 ½ cups garlic salt
½ cup + 3 tbsp. celery salt
1 cup onion salt
4 cups dehydrated light brown sugar
1 ½ cups sweet paprika
2 cups light chili powder
¾ cup ground black pepper
½ cup cayenne pepper
1 ¼ cups ground cumin
1 ¾ cups granulated garlic
½ cup ground cinnamon
2 tbsp. ground nutmeg

DoMundo’s original recipe bbq sauce
Yield: 3 quarts

½ cup fresh minced garlic
¼ cup olive oil
7 ¼ cups ketchup
2 qt. apple cider vinegar
1 ½ cups molasses
3 ¼ lb. light brown sugar
3 tbsp. ground mustard seed
½ cup paprika
¼ cup spicy brown mustard
3 tbsp. liquid smoke
½ cup light chili powder
1 tsp. cayenne pepper
1 tsp. cinnamon

Steps

  1.  Mix together ingredients for Piggyback Rub.
  2. Completely coat each Boston butt with  ½ cup of rub.
  3. Cook in 240°F smoker for 10 to 12 hours, or until bone can just be pulled free and meat is fork tender.
  4. Remove bone and pull pork using pair of forks. Mix in remaining ½ cup of rub and serve immediately with DoMundo's Original Recipe BBQ Sauce (recipe follows) or use  in favorite recipe. 

DoMundo’s original recipe bbq sauce

  1. Sweat garlic in olive oil over medium heat for 2 minutes, or until fragrant. 
  2.  Add ketchup, vinegar, molasses and brown sugar and bring to a boil. Cook for 10 minutes.
  3. Add remaining ingredients and simmer for 1 ½ to 2 hours. Sauce should coat back of spoon when finished.

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