Cowboy Pinto Cheeseburger Sliders

Menu Part: 
Sandwich/Wrap
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
30

Take your guests on an adventure with these small but hearty sliders. Made from Bush’s Best® Low Sodium Pinto Beans and covered with cheese and a zesty enchilada mayo, they’re a sure crowd-pleaser.

Ingredients

Pinto Bean Cheeseburger Sliders
1, #10 can Low Sodium Bush’s Best® Pinto Beans, drained and rinsed
3 cups Breadcrumbs, plain
3 Tbsp Cumin, ground
6 each Garlic cloves
6 each Eggs, large, lightly beaten
2 ½ cups Bread crumbs, plain
59 each Slider rolls, split
15 each American cheese, quartered
5.9 oz. Shredded lettuce

Enchilada Mayo
¾ cup Mayonnaise, light
½ cup Enchilada Sauce, red

Steps

  1. Pre-heat deep fryer to 350°F.
  2. In a large bowl, combine pinto beans, 3 cups of breadcrumbs, cumin, garlic, and eggs; mix lightly until combined. In batches, transfer to a food processor and pulse ingredients until smooth. Hold refrigerated.
  3. Scoop 1.5 oz of pinto bean mixture, and form into patty, ¼”-⅜” thick, lightly roll each patty in remaining breadcrumbs to coat. Fry for 2-3 minutes, or until internal temperature is 165°F is reached and golden brown on outside. Hold warm for service.
  4. To make one serving, lightly toast inside of each slider. On heel, place patty, quartered slice of cheese, 0.1 oz of lettuce, and 1 tsp of enchilada mayo on crown. Serve two per order.

To Make Enchilada Mayo

  1. In a bowl combine mayo and sauce; whisk until well combined.
  2. Refrigerate for service.

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