Corn-Ricotta Crespelle with Wild Mushrooms

Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 
Italian
Serves: 
4

Crespelle are the Italian equivalent of crepes and just as simple to prepare. The corn-ricotta crespelle are topped with a savory mixture of wild mushrooms, corn, garlic, thyme, shallot, olive oil, butter and fresh-grated Parmesan cheese.

Ingredients

For Corn-Ricotta Filling:
1 cup fresh white corn kernels
1 tsp. chopped fresh sage
1 oz. butter
1 oz. heavy cream
1⁄2 cup ricotta

For Crespelle Batter:
3 eggs
1 cup flour
1 cup milk
Salt and pepper, to taste
Olive oil, for cooking crepes

For Assembly:
1-2 oz. extra-virgin olive oil
1 1⁄2 cups mixed wild mushrooms
1⁄2 tsp. chopped garlic
1⁄2 tsp. chopped thyme
1⁄2 teaspoon chopped shallot
1⁄4 cup fresh corn kernels
1 cup chicken stock
1 oz. butter
Parmesan cheese, for grating

Steps

1. For Filling: Lightly sauté corn and sage in butter over low heat for 5 min., stirring so corn doesn’t brown. Add cream and stir 2-3 min. more until dry. Push corn mixture through a food mill fitted with the fine attachment; discard corn skins. Mix corn pulp with ricotta and set aside in the refrigerator.

2. For the Crespelle Batter: Combine eggs and flour to form a paste. Add milk and blend well; season with a pinch of salt and pepper. Strain through a chinois and let rest 2 hours.

3. To Make Crespelle: In a 10-in. nonstick pan, heat a few drops of olive oil until medium-hot. Off heat, add 1 1⁄2 oz. crepe batter and immediately tilt the pan in all directions until evenly spread. Return to heat and lightly brown one side; flip crepe over and lightly brown the other side; remove to parchment paper. Repeat to form three more crepes; do not overlap crepes on parchment.

4. To Assemble Crespelle: Spread 1 heaping tablespoon corn-ricotta filling on half of one crepe; fold other half over to create a half-moon. Spread 1⁄2 tbsp. filling over half of the half-moon and again fold top over, creating a wedge-shaped ricotta-filled crepe. Repeat with remaining crepes.

5. Final Assembly: Heat oil in a sauté pan. Add mushrooms and brown over medium-high heat for 3 min., tossing often. Add garlic, thyme, shallot, and 1⁄4 cup corn kernels; sauté 10-15 sec. Add stock and reduce by three-quarters.

Meanwhile, arrange assembled crespelle in a lightly buttered heatproof pan and place in 400°F oven for 5-8 min. Transfer crespelle to a plate. Add 1 oz. butter to mushroom mixture; stir until blended. Pour over crespelle, sprinkle with grated Parmesan cheese and serve immediately.

Source: Recipe from Chef Carmen Quagliata

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