Chipotle-Glazed Alaska Salmon with Spicy Peanut Salsa

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8

Rick Bayless is a pioneer in bringing authentic, regional Mexican food to American diners through his Chicago restaurants, TV cooking shows and culinary tours. Here, he uses two varieties of chilies to create a salsa and glaze for salmon.

Ingredients

4 garlic cloves
2 guajillo or ancho chilies, stemmed, seeded and torn in large pieces
2 cups salted peanuts, skinless, roasted
5 canned chipotle chilies, removed from the canning liquid
Salt, as needed
1/2 cup honey
8 each 5 to 6 oz Alaska salmon fillets
Fresh cilantro, roughly chopped for garnish

Steps

  1. Prepare salsa: In a dry skillet, roast garlic over med. heat, turning occasionally until soft and blackened in spots, about 15 min. Remove and let cool; peel.
  2.  In same skillet, toast the guajillo or ancho chilies, using a spatula to press them against the heated surface until aromatic. (You may see faint whisps of smoke.) Cover with hot water and rehydrate for 20 to 30 min.
  3.  Drain chilies and transfer to a blender. Add garlic, peanuts and 3 of the canned chipotles. Pour in water to the level of the peanuts and blend to a smooth puree. (If necessary, stir in more water to give the mixture the consistency of an easily spoonable salsa. Season with salt to taste, about 1/2 tsp.
  4. Prepare salmon: Preheat broiler. In food processor, combine remaining 2 chipotle chilies with honey and 1/2 tsp salt; puree. Lay salmon fillets on a lightly oiled baking sheet and position 4 in. below broiler. Broil 2 min.; flip pieces of fish and return to broiler for 2 more min.
  5. Brush salmon heavily with glaze; return under broiler and cook 2 min. more for medium to medium-rare salmon. Serve with the peanut salsa and a sprinkling of chopped cilantro.
Source: Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute

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