Buena Vista Steak Club

Buena Vista Steak Club
Menu Part: 
Sandwich/Wrap
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
24

The Buena Vista Steak Club features sauteed Philly-style steak strips, chimichurri sauce, black-bean aioli, sliced pickles and melted Gouda cheese on a Cuban roll.

Ingredients

Chimichurri sauce
1 1⁄2 cups extra virgin olive oil
2⁄3 cup red wine vinegar
1⁄3 cup chopped fresh parsley
3 tbsp. chopped cilantro
1 tsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. salt
1⁄2 tsp. ground cumin
1⁄2 tsp. black pepper

Black bean aïoli
2 1⁄2 cups mayonnaise
6 oz. canned black beans, drained and chopped
1⁄4 tsp. liquid smoke

24 soft Cuban rolls, split
48 slices Gouda cheese
24 portions frozen Philly-style shaved beef
48 slices tomato
48-96 slices dill pickle
12 oz. baby lettuce mix
Salt and pepper, to taste
 

Steps

1. For chimichurri sauce: In bowl, combine oil, vinegar, parsley, cilantro, garlic, salt, cumin and black pepper. Mix until blended. Cover and set aside.

2. For black bean aïoli: Combine mayonnaise, black beans and liquid smoke. Mix until thoroughly blended. Cover and refrigerate.

3. Prepare sandwiches to order: Brush 1 teaspoon chimichurri sauce on cut side of split roll and brown cut sides on griddle. Spread 2 tablespoons black bean aïoli on top half of roll. Place two slices of cheese on bottom half of roll and melt in salamander.

4. Cook one portion beef on hot oiled griddle. While cooking, drizzle with 2 teaspoons chimichurri sauce and season with salt and pepper. When done cooking, scoop beef onto bottom half of roll. Top with tomato, pickle and lettuce. Cover with top half of roll and grill or brown on both sides in panini press, or on a flattop griddle, using a flat weight to compress the sandwich.

5. Cut diagonally in half. Plate and serve.
 

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