Braised Turkey and Homemade Potato Gnocchi

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Italian
Serves: 
4

Dark meat turkey takes well to braising—a long, slow cooking method that turns tougher cuts of meat and poultry meltingly tender and flavorful.

Ingredients

Turkey Legs
4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 large carrot, large dice
1 med. leek, large dice
1 large onion, large dice
1 pint dry white wine
2 turkey legs (about 1 lb. total)
3 qt. turkey stock
3 oz. dried mushrooms
1 tbsp. juniper berries
2 tbsp. black peppercorns
3 bay leaves

Potato Gnocchi
6 russet potatoes
2 egg yolks
1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsp. kosher salt
2 cups all-purpose flour

2 tbsp. unsalted butter
1 med. shallot, minced
2 tbsp. fresh rosemary, finely chopped
2 tbsp. pink peppercorns, finely chopped
2 oz. grated Parmesan cheese
2 oz. shaved Parmesan cheese, for garnish

Steps

  1. Heat olive oil in a med. pot; brown diced carrot, leek and onions. Deglaze with wine.
  2.  Lightly season turkey legs with salt and pepper.  Add legs to vegetables; cover with stock; stir in dried mushrooms.
  3. Wrap juniper berries, black peppercorns and bay leaves in cheesecloth and tie shut. Gently hammer to break peppercorns and berries.  Place in pot with meat and vegetables.
  4. Bring to a simmer and turn off heat. Cover pot with foil and place in 325ºF oven for about 90 min. or until turkey slides down bone about an inch. Pick turkey off bones. Strain and reserve braising liquid.
  5. Prepare Gnocchi: Roast potatoes on bed of salt at 350ºF for 1 hr. or until fully cooked. Peel and run through food mill.
  6. Mix egg yolk with olive oil; add to potatoes along with salt.
  7. Gently work ingredients together and slowly add flour. Avoid over-mixing. Cut small pieces from dough and roll out by-hand into ropes; keep table dusted with flour so dough doesn’t stick. Using a bench knife, cut ropes into small, uniform pieces. Cook in boiling water in small batches until gnocchi float; remove with slotted spoon.
  8. When ready to serve, sauté shallots, some braising liquid and a little butter until shallots lose their rawness.  Add some turkey meat, chopped rosemary and pink peppercorns. Add cooked gnocchi to sauté pan; toss with grated Parmesan.  Use additional stock and butter as needed. Spoon into bowls and garnish with shaved Parmesan.
Source: Chef Patrick Connolly Radius Restaurant, Boston, MA National Turkey Federation

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