Black Bean Pierogies

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 

These luscious dumplings are filled with a garlicky black bean filling. The tender sour cream dough is the perfect enclosure for the spicy filling. Serve in a steaming bowl of broth for a delicious treat.


1 lb. dry black beans
5 qt. vegetable broth, divided
1 qt. beet juice
2 cups chopped red onion
1⁄2 cup roasted garlic
1 tbsp. olive oil
2 cups dry red wine
1⁄2 cup chopped fresh basil
Salt and pepper to taste
Sour Cream Pierogi Dough (recipe follows)
1 tsp. saffron threads
4 cups julienned carrots
4 cups julienned zucchini
2 cups julienned fennel bulbs
2 cups julienned red bell peppers
1 cup chopped cilantro

For Sour Cream Pierogi Dough:
6 cups all-purpose flour
4 eggs, lightly beaten
2 cups sour cream


For the Black Bean filling:
1. Place beans in a large saucepan; cover with 2 in. cold water. Heat to boiling; boil 2 min. Let stand, covered 1 hr.; drain. Add 1 qt. vegetable broth and beet juice to beans. Heat to boiling; reduce heat and simmer, covered, until beans begin to soften, about 25 min.

2. Sauté onion and garlic in oil in medium skillet until tender, about 5 min.; stir in wine. Heat to boiling; boil until wine is reduced by half. Add wine mixture to beans. Continue to simmer beans, uncovered, until beans are tender and liquid is almost absorbed, about 25 min. Process beans in a food processor until smooth. Stir in basil and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cool.

3. Place 1 tbsp. bean mixture in center of each square of dough. Brush edges with beaten egg; fold diagonally in half and press edges to seal. Place on sheet pan in single layer; may be refrigerated
as long as overnight. Cook pierogies in batches in simmering water until dough is al dente and pierogies float; about 3 min.

4. Heat remaining 4 qt. broth with saffron to a boil; season to taste with salt and pepper and reserve.

5. For each serving, heat 6 oz. broth to boiling; add 2 oz. assorted julienned vegetables and simmer, covered until crisp-tender, about 3 min. Add 3 pierogies and simmer until warm, about 2 min. Transfer to shallow serving bowl and sprinkle with 2 tsp. cilantro.

For Sour Cream Pierogi Dough:

1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl; knead lightly on floured surface to form smooth dough. Let stand, covered, 30 min.

2. Cut dough into 4 equal pieces. Roll dough using pasta machine with rollers at widest setting, folding and rolling until very smooth and flouring dough as needed. Move machine rollers to next setting and roll dough (do not fold). Continue to change setting and roll dough until it is desired thickness, using the next to thinnest setting on machine. Cut rolled dough into 4-in. squares. Repeat with remaining dough.

Note: Pierogies can be cooked immediately after assembling. If pierogies are refrigerated overnight, the beet juice will tint the dough a pale pink. Pierogies can also be filled and frozen for up to 2 months.

Yield: 6 doz. pierogies.

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