Asian Braised Pork Belly

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Asian
Serves: 
4

Pork belly is the same cut of meat that is cured and smoked for bacon. Here, the slow, even heat of braising transforms it into a tender, juicy delight. Look for slabs of belly that are about 50/50 lean to fat.

Ingredients

2 lb. pork belly with skin
6 cups water or stock
1⁄4 cup Shao-Xing wine or dry Sherry
3 garlic cloves, smashed
6 slices fresh ginger
1⁄2 cup brown sugar
3 tbsp. soy sauce
1 lb. Savoy cabbage, sliced
3 leeks, cleaned and thinly sliced
1 cup cooked corn niblets

Steps

1. Divide pork belly into four portions. Score skin and sear on skin side until crisp.

2. In large saucepot, bring water, wine, garlic, and ginger to a boil. Add pork belly; reduce heat to medium and simmer 20 min.

3. Stir in sugar and soy sauce; reduce heat to low. Partially cover and braise 3 hr. or until meat is very tender.

4. Remove pork; keep warm. Reduce cooking liquid until syrupy, about 25 min.; strain.

5. Sauté cabbage and leeks until tender-crisp. Stir in corn.

6. For service, arrange some of cabbage mixture on ovenproof dish. Place one portion pork belly on top; brush with reduced cooking liquid. Cook in 350°F oven 10 min. to glaze.

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