Arepas de Puerco

Menu Part: 
Appetizer
Cuisine Type: 
Mexican
Serves: 
4

Although a traditional dish in South America, these arepas show a Nuevo Latino accent with their fusion of Asian and Latin flavors.

Ingredients

1 1/2 lb. pork butt
1 small yellow onion, chopped
1 bunch cilantro
1/2 cup hoisin sauce
1/4 cup white vinegar
3 chilies de arbol
3 tbsp. achiote pepper paste
2 tbsp. ichimi togarashi (Japanese red pepper flakes)
2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup sour cream
2 jalapenos, seeded and sliced
Sesame seeds, for garnish

Arepas (recipe follows)
1/2 cup lukewarm water
2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup masarepa (yellow corn meal)

Guacamole (recipe follows)
3 small, ripe hass avocados
1/4 cup diced tomato
2 tbsp. finely chopped onion
2 tbsp. finely chopped cilantro
2 serrano chilies, seeded, deveined and diced
1 tsp. lime juice
1/8 tsp. salt

 

Steps

  1. Cut pork butt into smaller, uniform pieces to ensure equal cooking time. In a large pot, combine pork, onion, cilantro, hoisin, vinegar, chilies, achiote, togarashi and salt with enough water to cover the pork, making sure achiote and hoisin are completely dissolved. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to low, cover and simmer until fork-tender, about 3 hr.
  2. Remove pork from liquid and set aside to cool. When cool, pull pork with fingers. Strain liquid and return to cover pork, adjust seasoning. Set pork aside and keep warm.
  3. Meanwhile, prepare Arepas and Guacamole (below).
  4. For service, cut two of the arepas in half sideways and arrange on a small plate. Layer each half with small amount of pork, followed by 1 tsp. guacamole, 1/2 tsp. sour cream and a slice of jalapeno. Garnish with sesame seeds. Repeat with remaining arepas.

Guacamole

  1. In bowl, scoop out and mash avocados. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Adjust seasoning as needed.

Arepas

  1. In bowl, combine water and salt. Slowly mix in masarepa until absorbed. (It should have a firm consistency.
  2. Divide dough into 8 equal balls. Roll each in palms of hands to form a smooth ball; press into a disc, about 11/2-in. thick.
  3. Cook disks in nonstick pan over low heat until lightly browned on each side, about 2 min.
     
Source: Chef Richard Sandoval, Zengo, Washington, D.C. Avocados from Mexico

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Denver Public Schools has begun posting cooking videos on its Facebook page in an effort to promote the scratch-made meals served in its cafeterias, Denverite reports.

The video tutorials are set up in a similar way to Buzzfeed’s Tasty videos, showing a pair of hands from above as they prepare a meal to background music. The Colorado district promotes the videos with the hashtag #DPSDelicious.

Read the full story via denverite.com .

Industry News & Opinion

Oregon State University will begin weighing waste in its food halls after receiving a $27,000 grant from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s Materials Management program, the Gazette Times reports.

The school will use the money to install a computer-based system to help keep track of the waste .

Through the system, which includes a scale and a camera, staff will be able to weigh leftover food and take a photo of it before it’s discarded.

After reviewing the data collected, school officials say they may try to reduce portion sizes, alter purchases or...

Sponsored Content
Yuzu

From T. Marzetti® Foodservice.

If the current culinary interest in yuzu is any indication, today’s diners are seeking fresher flavors and cleaner eats. Yuzu, a bumpy, big-seeded citrus fruit, is turning up regularly as a tart and tangy ingredient in appetizers, salad dressings and marinades due to its nutritional benefits and tasty flavor.

Here’s how operators can combine seasonal ingredients such as yuzu with other clean label meal components for an easy way to bring health and flavor to the top of the menu.

Healthy and delicious

It’s no secret that diners want...

Industry News & Opinion

The foodservice program at Lee Public Schools in Lee, Mass., has ended its 2017 fiscal year with a $21,560 surplus, The Berkshire Eagle reports.

The surplus marks a large jump over 2015, when the program closed out the fiscal year with a $10,000 deficit.

Food Service Director Lorrie Goodfellow says the surplus is due to expanding breakfast , buying quality food at lower prices and cutting back on food waste.

"We've increased sales, especially at breakfast, where sales are up 39%. Lunch participation is up about 1%,” Goodfellow said.

Breakfast at the district...

FSD Resources