Three Takes On: Stuffing

Three Takes On offers several different versions of the same classic dish. This month: Stuffing.

Published in FSD Update

Sausage and apple cornbread stuffing

Hallmark (Kansas City, Mo.) 

When Hallmark launched its Hallmark Health Rewards initiative, the foodservice department was looking for ways to take comfort-style recipes and make them healthier by altering a few ingredients. “We felt this approach was needed in our culture where there is such a significant number of manufacturing employees who were very used to comfort food diets,” says Christine Rankin, corporate services manager. This stuffing was one of the recipes included in the initiative.

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Spinach & artichoke stuffing

New Jersey Institute of Technology (Newark)

Peter Fischbach, regional director of culinary development for Gourmet Dining, says this basic stuffing recipe was tweaked to create something a bit more special for students on campus. “The addition of not only the spinach and artichoke but also the Boursin and Parmesan cheeses are what really make this stuffing pop. The cheeses add a rich creaminess.”

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Oyster stuffing

Riderwood (Silver Spring, Md.)

Like many recipes, this version of stuffing started first as a family favorite before moving into the dining program at this senior living facility in Maryland. “What makes it unique is the use of local products from the Chesapeake Bay, which is very different from your classic stuffing,” says Victor Cirrincione, executive chef. “Oysters give the stuffing an umami, savory flavor that makes it a great combination with turkey and earthy vegetables served at Thanksgiving. It is Colonial in its creation, which makes it a regional favorite from Maryland to Virginia.”

See full recipe

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