Three Takes On: Guacamole

Enchilada sauce, grapes and a healthy twist make these versions of guacamole special.

Avocado Tomatillo Salsa from the
University of Texas.

Avocado Tomatillo Salsa

University of Texas (Austin, Texas)

Texans love their guacamole, so it’s no surprise Campus Executive Chef Robert Mayberry, at the University of Texas, Austin, has created some innovative recipes. For this take, Mayberry starts with a classic guacamole recipe and adds a Tomatillo Enchilada Sauce. “The tomatillo lends a nice tartness to the dish,” Mayberry says. “This is not as thick as guacamole. We use this version on our nacho and topping bars. It’s also great on chicken.”

See full recipe

Livin’ Smart Guacamole 

Luby’s Culinary Services (Houston)

Dan Phalen, corporate executive chef for Luby’s Fuddruckers, developed this twist on a classic guacamole to make it healthier for the management company’s hospital accounts. “We noticed that while our patients could definitely use the cardiovascular benefits from the Omega-3 fats in avocados, it still was a substantial amount of fat if eaten in any great quantity,” Phalen says. This recipe is half guacamole and half puréed white beans. “The flavor is very good as a dip with baked pita chips. There’s a significant reduction in fat, plus an added boost of protein from the white beans. This makes for a good sandwich wrap spread as well.”

See full recipe

Guacamole Chamacuero

Compass Group

This creamy version of a guacamole can be used as a sweet sauce or dip. Christine Seitz, director of culinary for business excellence, says the recipe was inspired by Mexican food maven Diana Kennedy. The recipe was developed to meet the management company’s nutritional guidelines for the whole+sum program. This guacamole is touted as a “super food.” “The combination of the grapes is wonderful not only for flavor, crunch and sweetness but also balancing the fat and calories,” Seitz says. 

See full recipe

More From FoodService Director

Menu Development
ranch dressing chicken fingers

While salad bars are often the first place K-12 operators look to incorporate more fresh produce, few go as far as making their own salad dressings. But last fall, in a continuing effort to transition from prepackaged meals to an all-scratch menu, Mark Augustine, executive chef of culinary and nutrition services for Minneapolis Public Schools, switched to concocting four varieties in-house—ranch, Caesar, Italian and Asian vinaigrette. The move, designed to eliminate artificial ingredients and lower fat and sodium, presented the biggest challenge when it came to ranch dressing, the school-...

Ideas and Innovation
business card

We get the new folks abridged business cards saying, “Hi, my name is so-and-so and I work in nutrition department.” We thought it would give them more ownership of the program and elevate their status and position in the organization. It also gives our team more self-confidence and self-worth as an employee, which can be a challenge with foodservice workers.

Ideas and Innovation
tug hospital robot

Automation has opened up in recent years as foodservice operators across the country grapple with labor shortages. Robots deliver food trays to patients in hospitals, and they make sushi on college campuses. For some operators, they’re worthwhile to reduce strain on human employees and increase productivity.

Robots roamed the hallways when the University of California San Francisco Medical Center’s new Mission Bay campus opened last year. Though these robots have nicknames like Wall-E and Tuggie McFresh, they’re not a novelty. They’re a solution to a problem that administrators...

Ideas and Innovation
sandwich sub

At our corporate operation in the Kohl’s headquarters, two kinds of sandwiches are available daily—an artisan version and a more straightforward sub. While planning out a business model for the space, Kohl’s wanted something that was quality driven, but very sensitive to pricing for associates. Diners are comfortable spending about $6 to $7 for lunch.

FSD Resources