Three Takes On: Guacamole

Enchilada sauce, grapes and a healthy twist make these versions of guacamole special.

Avocado Tomatillo Salsa from the
University of Texas.

Avocado Tomatillo Salsa

University of Texas (Austin, Texas)

Texans love their guacamole, so it’s no surprise Campus Executive Chef Robert Mayberry, at the University of Texas, Austin, has created some innovative recipes. For this take, Mayberry starts with a classic guacamole recipe and adds a Tomatillo Enchilada Sauce. “The tomatillo lends a nice tartness to the dish,” Mayberry says. “This is not as thick as guacamole. We use this version on our nacho and topping bars. It’s also great on chicken.”

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Livin’ Smart Guacamole 

Luby’s Culinary Services (Houston)

Dan Phalen, corporate executive chef for Luby’s Fuddruckers, developed this twist on a classic guacamole to make it healthier for the management company’s hospital accounts. “We noticed that while our patients could definitely use the cardiovascular benefits from the Omega-3 fats in avocados, it still was a substantial amount of fat if eaten in any great quantity,” Phalen says. This recipe is half guacamole and half puréed white beans. “The flavor is very good as a dip with baked pita chips. There’s a significant reduction in fat, plus an added boost of protein from the white beans. This makes for a good sandwich wrap spread as well.”

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Guacamole Chamacuero

Compass Group

This creamy version of a guacamole can be used as a sweet sauce or dip. Christine Seitz, director of culinary for business excellence, says the recipe was inspired by Mexican food maven Diana Kennedy. The recipe was developed to meet the management company’s nutritional guidelines for the whole+sum program. This guacamole is touted as a “super food.” “The combination of the grapes is wonderful not only for flavor, crunch and sweetness but also balancing the fat and calories,” Seitz says. 

See full recipe

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