The Sandwich, Re-Imagined

Operators look to please today's consumer with unique offerings

Pesto Chicken Sandwich

The popularity of the sandwich shows no signs of stopping, as operators move beyond old standbys and present consumers with ethnic flavorings, gourmet ingredients and toppings, and new carrier options—everything from flavoredwraps to waffles.

Morrison Management Specialists
Atlanta

As the vice president of culinary, Chef Cary Neff oversees the menus at the 1,000 healthcare and senior living facilities that are part of Morrison Management Specialists.

“Now it’s not okay to just serve a club, burger and turkey,” says Neff. “People have a much better appreciation for what goes between two slices of bread. Even our club has a salmon version.”

Menus at Morrison facilities are built around emerging trends and fresh ingredients. Neff adds nutritious watercress rather than plain lettuce to slow roasted, shaved turkey sandwiches. The Morrison “Great Living” menu has become so popular for patients that it is also served at hospital retail outlets.  Neff purchases poultry and pork with minimal antibiotics, sustainable seafood and seasonal local produce for the sandwich menu.

“We serve a lot of ‘Bubbas’ whom you may think want meat, but they like our hummus sandwich with Kalamata olives,” says Neff.

The diversity of spreads at Morrison not only includes hummus, but also lemon rosemary cream cheese, Southwestern cilantro lime spread, chipotle-orange mayonnaise and an array of mustards.

A bestselling sandwich for the senior living segment is a Greek vegetable pita with grilled vegetables, feta and tzadiki sauce. For kids’ sandwiches at hospitals, Neff’s team designed Bruce the Moose strawberry ketchup, which adds a healthy fruit and fun to the menu

Morrison Management Specialists Menu Sampler

  • Tuscan Turkey Sandwich, Sliced Tuscan turkey, roasted red peppers, spinach with mayo on whole-grain bread
  • Pesto Chicken Sandwich, Chicken layered with lettuce, tomato on whole-wheat sandwich thin
  • Nutella Whole-Wheat Flabread, Nutella topped with mixed berries, apples, bananas, pineapple and toasted coconut on whole wheat flatbread

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