Greens beyond lettuce

Kale, arugula and other leafy greens are adding color to menus.

Published in FSD Update

By 
Lindsey Ramsey, Contributing Editor

Arugula

The peppery bite of arugula is ideal for salads and sandwiches, says Susan Chee, retail food service manager for Northwest Community Hospital, in Arlington Heights, Ill.

“We serve a chicken flatbread that uses arugula,” Chee says. “The flatbread features Monterey Jack cheese, diced chicken, arugula and has a drizzle of ranch dressing on top. We also ran a sandwich special that uses arugula [atop] seasoned chicken on a ciabatta roll with pesto, tomatoes and a basil spread. Arugula is one of those greens that everyone is buzzing about right now. We can take a same old sandwich and add arugula to it and people get excited about it.”

Williams also likes to use arugula in salads and sandwiches. This spring he plans to introduce an avocado, scallop, grape and arugula salad, which will also use the citrus poppy seed dressing.

“We’ve also been replacing lettuce on sandwiches with arugula,” Williams adds. “We’ve got a new sandwich coming in where we take fresh mozzarella, roasted red bell pepper, roasted portobello mushroom and top it with arugula. There’s also a little balsamic vinaigrette in there to add some moisture.”

Arugula can even be used to make pesto, as in Vanderbilt’s broccoli and tortellini salad with arugula pesto. The dish features pesto made with garlic, baby arugula, pecorino cheese, extra-virgin olive oil, toasted pine nuts, freshly grated lemon zest and salt. The broccoli is then blanched and tossed with cooked cheese tortellini.

Other varieties

Claypool uses a few other less common varieties of greens to switch things up. One recent popular vegan dish featured bulgur wheat and mustard greens.

“It’s a really nutrient-dense dish,” Claypool says. “We take bulgur wheat and walnuts and sauté [them] with shallots, garlic and the mustard greens. Toward the end we hit it with some pitted, chopped up dates and a little white wine vinegar. We also have done a Swiss chard and feta cheese tart. We basically made creamed chard, cooled it off and added some feta and an egg mixture. We put that mixture in 5-inch savory tart shells. It makes like a little quiche.”

The department also does a similar dish called Swiss chard gratin. The team cooks down Swiss chard with some cheese and an egg mixture and then pours that into a pan and bakes the whole thing.

“It gets all brown and luscious on top and then we cut it into little wedges,” Claypool says. “We also use a savoy cabbage in an Asian-inspired salad. It’s got peppers, bamboo shoots, water chestnuts and an Asian-soy-based vinaigrette. Savoy cabbage is a lot easier to eat raw than regular cabbage. It’s got a different leaf structure to it.”

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