Pumpkin Bread, St. Paul Public Schools

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
1,040 muffins

Angie Gaszak, R.D., nutrition specialist, says this recipe was just one of the district’s breakfast items that were developed when the department started offering more from-scratch options. Gaszak says that by cooking from scratch, the department can control the ingredients and create products with a “clean” nutrition label—no artificial colors, flavors, high fructose corn syrup, chemical additives or preservatives or hydrogenated vegetable oils. To meet the new USDA breakfast regulations, whole-wheat flour was added to be greater than 50% by weight of the total flour used. “By swapping out butter with vegetable oil, it not only lowered the sodium but also created a more favorable fat profile with less saturated fat,” Gaszak says. “The addition of puréed pumpkin adds a beautiful, rich orange color as well as the antioxidant beta carotene and dietary fiber. Last, the classic combination of fall spices adds an additional antioxidant punch, while boosting the flavors of this classic fall squash.”

Ingredients

42 lb. + 12 oz. granulated sugar
13 lb. + 4 oz. salad oil
7 lb. + 8 oz. eggs, 40°F
32 lb. canned pumpkin
19 lb. + 8 oz. Ultragrain Flour
16 lb. all-purpose flour
3 oz. baking powder
12 oz. baking soda
13 oz. salt
1.5 oz. ground clove
3 oz. ground cinnamon
3 oz. ground nutmeg
3 oz. ground allspice
10 lb. water

Steps

1. Mix sugar, oil, eggs and pumpkin in 140-quart mixer. Mix for 1 minute on first speed. Scrape bowl. Mix 1 minute on second speed.

2. Add remaining ingredients. Mix for 1 minute on first speed. Scrape bowl. Mix 2 minutes on third speed.

3. Pour 2 ounces of batter into each cup of greased muffin sheet pan.

4. Bake for 40 minutes at 325°F.

Recipe by St. Paul Public Schools, Minnesota  

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