Pennsylvania Wild Mushroom and Herb Risotto

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
Four servings

Typically more of an indulgent dish, this healthy spin on creamy risotto omits butter and heavy cream, “transforming traditional risotto into a healthful accompaniment as a side dish,” according to Executive Chef Cameron Clegg. Any combination of mushrooms can be used to build the dish, and at Highmark, “we substituted short-grain brown rice for the more traditional arborio rice. It takes a little longer to cook, but the nutritional benefit is worth the wait,” Clegg says. “Adding fresh peas or asparagus [will also] make this entrée a great meal.”

Ingredients

1 small carrot, finely chopped
1 large shallot, finely chopped
16 oz. Pennsylvania wild mushrooms (portobello, oyster, cremini, shiitake)
2 cups short-grain brown rice
4 cups chicken stock
1 cup water
1⁄3 cup dry white wine
2 cloves garlic, minced
1⁄2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 tbsp. freshly grated lemon zest
1 cup small diced roasted red pepper
1 cup freshly chopped herbs
Freshly ground pepper to taste
Parmesan cheese (for garnish)

Steps

  1. Coat medium-sized skillet with cooking spray. Combine carrot, shallot and half the mushrooms and sauté until heated through.
  2. Add rice, then chicken stock. Add water and wine; stir to combine. Cover and cook on low heat until rice is tender and risotto is thick and creamy, about 1 to 1 1⁄2 hours, stirring occasionally.
  3. In small skillet, sauté remaining mushrooms with garlic.
  4. Mix half the sautéed mushrooms, Parmesan, lemon zest and roasted red pepper into risotto. (If risotto is dry, add little wine or water.)
  5. Serve sprinkled with remaining sautéed mushrooms, chopped herbs, pepper and Parmesan cheese.
Source: Highmark, Parkhurst Dining, Pittsburgh

More From FoodService Director

Managing Your Business
pizza toppings

When the FoodService Director editors first started tossing around the idea of an “influencers” issue, our minds immediately turned to, well, foodservice directors. After all, so much of the learning in this industry is a peer-to-peer experience, and it’s your influence that inspires the content in every single issue of this magazine.

Then we imagined the massive infighting that would occur if we tried to whittle ourselves down to a list of just 20 influential operators and thought better of it. There’s already enough arguing for us to do about which pizza toppings are best (...

Ideas and Innovation
bolognese sauce

We’re trying to bring scratch cooking to all the elementary schools, but we’re taking it dish by dish. Right now, we satellite a lot of the dishes out. This month we made a Bolognese from scratch, and went to each of the schools to talk to them about the process and see if they could implement it. It helps us find out the hurdles and what they are going to need to make it work.

Ideas and Innovation
unsung heroes graphic

Febin Bellamy, a senior at Georgetown University, is the founder of Unsung Heroes, a nonprofit that features service workers on college campuses in man-on-the-street-style Facebook interviews. This year, Bellamy is working with a dozen schools to launch their own chapters of the storytelling platform. Here’s what he’s learned about staff shoutouts.

Q: Why did you decide to start Unsung Heroes?

A: One day I started a conversation with a custodial worker in the business school that I would see all the time. I learned that we had a lot of similarities; for instance, we both wanted to...

Ideas and Innovation
chicken and waffles

Our elementary menu is currently riding the breakfast-anytime advertising trend by offering Breakfast for Lunch every Tuesday. It ranks as our highest participation, and it was a great way for us to introduce chicken and waffles inspired by an IHOP dish.

FSD Resources