Blueberry Quinoa Protein Cake, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, N.J.

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
1 cake

Michael Atanasio, manager of food and nutrition at Overlook Medical Center, says he likes “to challenge people in terms of thought and creativity.” He certainly put his chef, Todd Daigenault, to the test when he asked him to come up with a cake that could be made healthier with the addition of quinoa. But the chef came through with not one but two versions, including the recipe found below. “While we were revising the patient menu, my chief clinical dietitian and I wanted to do something different with desserts,” Atanasio explains. “So I asked Todd what he might be able to do with quinoa. He didn’t disappoint, and the cakes have really gained popularity.” He admits the cakes aren’t fat free, but the quinoa does add a tasty benefit to dessert. The cakes are now being produced by a local bakery, which bakes them and portions them into clamshells for sale “much cheaper than we could do here.” Atanasio adds that Daigenault is experimenting with a gluten-free version by using chickpea flour. 

Ingredients

3 cups cake flour
1 tbsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
2 cups granulated sugar
5 large eggs
2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 ¼ cups buttermilk
4 oz. cooked red quinoa
¼ cup blueberries
 

Steps

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter and line with parchment paper two 9-by-4-inch round pans.
2. In medium bowl, sift together flour, baking powder and salt.
3. Cut butter into 1-inch pieces and place in large bowl of electric mixer, fitted with paddle attachment or beaters. Beat for 3 minutes of medium-high speed until butter is light and creamy in color. Stop and scrape bowl, them cream butter for additional 60 seconds.
4. Add sugar, ¼ cup at a time, beating for 1 minute after each addition. Scrape sides of bowl occasionally. Add eggs one at a time.
5. Reduce mixer speed. Stir vanilla into buttermilk. Add dry ingredients alternately with buttermilk. Mix just until incorporated. Scrape sides of bowl and mix for 15 seconds longer. When batter is complete, gently fold in quinoa and fresh blueberries into batter.
6. Spoon batter into prepared pans and smooth tops with knife. Lift pans and let batter drop onto counter lightly to burst any air bubbles. Allow batter to settle.
7. Center pans onto lower third of oven and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until cake is lightly browned.
 

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Students at Peak Island Elementary School in Portland, Ore., are creating a healthy lunch for their peers in the Portland Public School District, The Forecaster reports.

The students were asked to create the lunch after they participated in a program called Clean Plate, which had them examine how healthy eating affects the human body. The district’s foodservice director has worked to help the students understand what is required of school lunches that meet national nutrition standards and make sense for large-volume preparation.

All 6,800 students in the district will be...

Industry News & Opinion

Capital School District in Dover, Del., has a new food truck, one that will serve lunch to students during summer break, Delaware State News reports.

The truck will travel through the district every Monday through Thursday over the break and will offer lunch to anyone 18 and under.

The district offers weekly free lunch at the Capital City Farmers Market during the summer; however, school officials hope that the mobility of the food truck will help reach children who are unable to make it to the market, as well as enable staff to provide food that requires more preparation...

Sponsored Content
organic fruits veggies

From WhiteWave Away from Home.

Organic food has gone mainstream in recent years. And consumers of all ages believe organic food is not just healthier—but tastier—than conventional counterparts, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report.

No demographic group, however, values organic offerings as highly as those aged 18 to 34.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of millennials, compared to 44% overall, say they’re more likely to purchase and willing to pay at least slightly more for menu items with organic claims, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy...

Industry News & Opinion

Chefs at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., participated in plant-based food training earlier this month as part of an effort to introduce more vegetarian, vegan and allergen-free dishes on campus, The Daily Evergreen Reports.

Over two days, chefs worked in pairs with plant-based ingredients to create new dishes such as vegan pizza, cauliflower fried rice and vegetable wellington.

Washington State’s dining services said it hopes to expand the presence of plant-based dishes throughout all campus dining halls as student demand rises, noting that items with animal...

FSD Resources