Baked Chicken Marsala, Cornell University

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Italian
Serves: 
50 4-oz. portions

At Cornell University, in Ithaca, N.Y., Cornell Dining has a campuswide program called Eating Well with Cornell Dining. The program highlights any menu items that are reduced in fat, calories and sodium and made with all unprocessed ingredients, says Steve Miller, senior executive chef.

“We try to focus on items to increase flavor, while decreasing total calories, fat , and sodium and use fresh and not processed foods. The way to increase customer satisfaction is to provide huge flavors but cut back on butter, cream and cheeses. Herbs and spices take the place of salt in most Eating Well with Cornell Dining dishes.”

For this baked chicken Marsala dish the chef substituted chicken breast for chicken thighs, reduced salt and baked the chicken instead of sautéing it. These steps reduced calories by 50%, fat by 70% and sodium by 40%, according to Michele Wilbur, R.D., Cornell’s dietitian.

“The responses for the Eating Well at Cornell Dining program have been great,” Miller says. “Students are now looking for the red apple icon, which we use to signify that the recipe falls into the Eating Well with Cornell Dining program guidelines. We display the apple on menus in the units as well as our menus online. Also, chefs are eager to incorporate more Eating Well menu items into their cycles.”

Ingredients

¼ cup canola oil
4 oz. flour
¾ tsp. salt
¾ tsp. ground poultry seasoning
1 tbsp. ground black pepper
12 lb. + 8 oz. chicken breast
½ cup Marsala cooking wine
10 oz. button mushroom
1 oz. chopped garlic in oil
1 qt. chicken stock
¾ tsp. rosemary

Steps

1. Heat oil in large skillet. Combine flour, salt, poultry seasoning and pepper. Dredge chicken in flour mixture, shaking off excess.

2. Place chicken breasts in skillet. Once one side is golden in color, turn chicken over and cook 3 minutes longer. Place onto sheet tray sprayed with canola oil spray. Bake chicken in preheated 350°F until internal temperature reaches 165°F.

3. Meanwhile, deglaze pan with Marsala wine. After 1 minute, add mushrooms, garlic and rosemary to skillet. Sauté briefly until garlic is golden and mushrooms have released juices.

4. Add chicken stock and stir until combined. Reduce by half; sauce will thicken itself. Season glaze to taste with salt and pepper.

5. Remove chicken from oven. Place on serving platter and pour sauce over chicken breasts. Garnish with chopped parsley.

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